Medical examination by Mobile Medic. Medical examination by Mobile Medic.

Army Medical Department (AMEDD)

Pursue a successful health care career at one of the largest and most advanced medical facilities while providing a meaningful service to your country.

Female Soldier wearing OCP inside of medical facility holding a black light and a jar. Female Soldier wearing OCP inside of medical facility holding a black light and a jar.

Get More Out of Your Medical Career

The U.S. Army Medical Department is among the largest comprehensive systems of health care in the country.

  • Serves Soldiers, their families, military retirees, and, at times, the general public
  • Physicians and top licensed medical doctors use and often pioneer the most sophisticated medical technologies and latest treatment modalities
  • Propels our country forward by better serving the people in it

The Army Health Care Advantage

As a member of the Army health care team, you’ll receive benefits that you won’t be able to get in a civilian career.

Challenging Work

Feel inspired with great case diversity and over 40,000 visits coming into the U.S. Army medical facilities and clinics around the world every day. See and study diseases that are not usually encountered in the private sector, and work on vaccines for viruses like Zika and COVID-19 that can have a global impact.

Fewer Barriers

Practice medicine with fewer limitations by treating patients not on their ability to pay, but by the treatment you see necessary. The U.S. Army Medical Department is one of the few places in the world where comprehensive patient care is the top priority.

Serve a Purpose

Enjoy the deep satisfaction of performing an important service for your country. Make not only a profound difference in the lives of Soldiers in the Army, but in the lives of their families, friends, and the general public.

The Army Medical Command is Composed of Six Corps

Each MEDCOM Corps has a specific function that works together as a team to maintain the U.S. Army’s high standards in patient care.

Caucasian female Anesthesiologist providing anesthesia to patient while Caucasian male general Surgeon performs surgery in hospital operating room. Caucasian female Anesthesiologist providing anesthesia to patient while Caucasian male general Surgeon performs surgery in hospital operating room.

Army Medical Corps

Contains over 40 specialties, from internal medicine and neurosurgery to pathology, anesthesiology, and psychiatry.

Army Medical Corps physicians practice in three main areas:

  • Operational Medicine
  • Clinical Medicine
  • Research Medicine

Caucasian male SPC Lab Technician wearing OCP holding test tubes inside a medical office. Caucasian male SPC Lab Technician wearing OCP holding test tubes inside a medical office.

Medical Service Corps

The Medical Service Corps is the most diverse branch of the U.S. Army. This Corps is home to medical administrative, scientific, and provider specialties, from direct patient care to management of the U.S. Army’s health service system.

Disciplines include:

  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Health Services
  • Laboratory Sciences
  • Optometry
  • Pharmacy
  • Podiatry
  • Preventative Medicine

Male Physical Therapist wearing OCP training with a male soldier wearing APFU inside during the daytime. Male Physical Therapist wearing OCP training with a male soldier wearing APFU inside during the daytime.

Medical Specialist Corps

The Medical Specialist Corps is home to four distinct specialties:

  • Physical Therapists
  • Occupational Therapists
  • Clinical Dietitians
  • Physician Assistants

Caucasian female CPT Veterinarian wearing OCP kneeling in Veterinary office with a dog. Caucasian female CPT Veterinarian wearing OCP kneeling in Veterinary office with a dog.

Veterinary Corps

The Veterinary Corps conducts and oversees all Department of Defense veterinary service activities. Army Veterinary Corps Officers are responsible for preventing contagious and zoonotic diseases, providing care to military working dogs, caring for ceremonial horses, treating family pets, and even supporting Human-Animal Bond Programs at military hospitals.

  • Veterinary Preventative Medicine
  • Laboratory Animal Medicine
  • Veterinary Pathology
  • Veterinary Comparative Medicine
  • Veterinary Clinical Medicine

Emergency Medical Staff examining patient wearing OCP inside an Emergency Room.
Emergency Medical Staff examining patient wearing OCP inside an Emergency Room.

Army Nurse Corps

The Army Nurse Corps represents more than 11,000 Soldiers dedicated to providing high-tech, quality health care for military personnel, their families, and military retirees all over the world. They support humanitarian missions and respond to natural disasters, experiences unmatched as a civilian nurse.

Army nurses choose one of five specialties:

  • Critical Care
  • Mental Health
  • Perioperative
  • Emergency Trauma
  • Gynecology/Obstetrics

Female Dental Specialist and Dentist holding dental equipment with patient indoors. Female Dental Specialist and Dentist holding dental equipment with patient indoors.

Army Dental Corps

The Army Dental Corps teaches more residents than any other institution in the country. It maintains modern dental facilities both in the U.S. and abroad in diverse countries. The Army’s Specialty Residency Programs produce graduates regularly scoring in the top 95th percentile.

The Army Dental Corps is comprised of nine specialties:

  • Comprehensive Dentistry
  • Oral Surgery
  • Maxillofacial Surgery
  • Orthodontistry
  • Prosthodontistry
  • General Dentistry
  • Oral Pathology
  • Public Health

Caucasian male ROTC Cadet wearing graduation robe standing facing Major in dress blues and family outside during the day. Caucasian male ROTC Cadet wearing graduation robe standing facing Major in dress blues and family outside during the day.

We’ll Help Pay for Your Education

The Army will fund medical school for those aspiring to serve. Through the U.S. Army’s Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP), you can:

  • Graduate from medical school debt-free
  • Earn a $2,400+ monthly allowance
  • Receive a $20,000 sign-on bonus

Doctors perform robotic surgery using DaVinci equipment. Doctors perform robotic surgery using DaVinci equipment.

Work with Superior Technology

Work with some of the most sophisticated medical technologies available in superior facilities. With more than 300 patents from spray-on skin to operating room robotics, U.S. Army medical professionals develop technologies and tools that reduce recovery times and increase quality of life for patients.

Some past and current innovations:

  • Developed 3-D printed surgical implants
  • Currently in Phase III trials for an HIV vaccine and Phase III trials for a breast cancer vaccine
  • Developed a portable, hand-held, battery-powered X-ray unit that allows X-rays to be taken anywhere

AMEDD doctors in hospital scrubs working in an Emergency Room. AMEDD doctors in hospital scrubs working in an Emergency Room.

AMEDD Requirements and Next Steps

Whether you’re looking to get into a career in health care or you’re already well into your journey, there are certain requirements and steps you’ll need to take in order to join.

  • Have a medical degree or plan to
  • Have a license to practice medicine
  • Be between 21 and 42 years old
  • Eligible for a secret security clearance

CONNECT WITH AN ARMY REPRESENTATIVE.

We understand that you probably have a million questions. Don’t worry, we’ve been there too. We’ll make sure you get all the answers you need.

Thanks for reaching out,

Here's What Happens Next

  1. You'll receive an email confirming your request

  2. We'll provide additional information about next steps

  3. You'll work with us to decide whether the Army is right for you

Questions you may have right now

Who will reach out to me?

One of our recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

Who will reach out to me?

One of our ROTC recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

What will you ask me?

Our conversation will likely begin with some basic qualifying questions, like your age and education level. From there, the conversation will be about getting to know you and your goals for the future. Expect us to ask about your interests and skills so we can suggest Army jobs that might interest you.

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How can the Army help me pay for college?

Do I have to go to Basic Training?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How can the Army help me pay for college?

What is the time commitment for part-time service?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Can the Army help me pay for medical school?

Do I have to go to Basic Training?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How do I apply for ROTC scholarships?

How do I join ROTC at the college I want to attend?

Will I be expected to join if I talk to someone?

No. Our goal is to answer your questions and help you decide if the Army is a good option for you. We understand you may not be ready to join yet, or that we may not be the right fit, and that's fine. There's no obligation for talking to us.

Thanks for reaching out,

Here's What Happens Next

  1. You'll receive an email confirming your request

  2. We'll provide additional information about next steps

  3. You'll work with us to decide whether the Army is right for you

Questions you may have right now

Who will reach out to me?

One of our recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

What will you ask me?

Our conversation will likely begin with some basic qualifying questions, like your age and education level. From there, the conversation will be about getting to know you and your goals for the future. Expect us to ask about your interests and skills so we can suggest Army jobs that might interest you.

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Do I qualify to join the Army?

Can I join as an Officer?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Do I qualify to join the Army?

Can I join as an Officer?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

What type of health care jobs are available in the Army?

Can the Army help me pay for medical school?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Can I join ROTC at my age

Can I join as an Officer?

Will I be expected to join if I talk to someone?

No. Our goal is to answer your questions and help you decide if the Army is a good option for you. We understand you may not be ready to join yet, or that we may not be the right fit, and that's fine. There's no obligation for talking to us.

Thanks for reaching out, .

We admire you for considering such a big career decision at your age. Unfortunately, we're unable to directly reach out to you until you are at least sixteen years old and a junior in high school. However, the following ROTC info is something that may interest you now.

Questions you may have right now

How old do I have to be to serve in the Army full-time?

To become an enlisted Soldier, you must be 17 years old. To become an Army Officer, you must be at least 18 years old and have a college degree obtained either through ROTC, U.S. Military Academy at West Point, or from another college or university program. Learn more about Army Eligibility Requirements and how to receive Officer training while in college.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you

How do I apply for ROTC Scholarships?

Army ROTC has several scholarships available for college-bound high school students. Review your options at ROTC Scholarships, or immediately apply by creating an account at my.goarmy.com to get started.

How old do I have to be to serve in the Army part-time?

To become an enlisted Soldier, you must be 17 years old. To become an Army Officer, you must be at least 18 years old and have a college degree obtained either through ROTC, U.S. Military Academy at West Point, or from another college or university program. Learn more about Army Eligibility Requirements and how to receive Officer training while in college.

What are the ways to serve part-time?

You can serve part-time as a Soldier in the Army Reserve or the Army National Guard. By serving part-time, you are able to continue your college education or work a civilian job, while earning an extra paycheck and maintaining many of the benefits of military service.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you.

How do I become a health care provider in the Army?

You can serve part-time or full-time as you train in our health care program. Upon graduation of the program, you will enter the Army health care team as a Commissioned Officer.

What types of medical careers are available in the Army?

There are numerous health care careers available through the Army Medical Education Deparment (AMEDD), including physicians, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and many more. View your career options.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you.

What are the benefits of joining ROTC?

ROTC makes it possible to achieve your ambitions. Become a leader and serve your country in one of the nation's top leadership training programs. You can do this while maintaining your college curriculum and earning up to 100% tuition coverage. Upon graduation, you're guaranteed a career as an Army Officer.

How do I prepare to join ROTC?

When you're at least 16 years old and at least a high school junior, you can reach out to us, or even talk to your high school counselor. Together, we'll talk options and decide if ROTC is the right path for you.

Will I become an Officer if I complete ROTC?

Yes. After graduation, you are commissioned as a highly respected second lieutenant in the Army, entrusted with leading other Soldiers.

Select the school you're most interested in

This helps us connect you to the right person, but if you're not sure yet, just select undecided.
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    Privacy Act Notice: The above disclosure is voluntary. All information will be used strictly for recruiting purposes. The authority for the collection of this information is Title 10, United States Code, Sections 503, 505, 508, and 12102, and EO 9397. For more information, please review our Privacy & Security Notice.

    Common Questions About AMEDD

    Do Army doctors have to go to Basic Training?

    As an AMEDD Officer, you won't participate in Basic Combat Training that enlisted Soldiers go through. Instead, you'll attend the AMEDD Basic Officer Leadership Course (BOLC), a basic orientation course to the Army Health Care System and the Army way of life.

    How long is AMEDD BOLC?

    The AMEDD Basic Officer Leadership Course (BOLC) for active-duty Officers is held four times a year at the AMEDD Center & School in Fort Sam Houston and lasts from 10 to 14 weeks. Officers in the Army Reserve go to BOLC for two weeks. Your training time depends on your chosen specialty and whether or not you have prior military experience.

    Do Army physicians have to pass a fitness test?

    Yes, you must meet Army height and weight standards, as well as pass the Army’s Fitness Test.

    What happens after AMEDD Officer Training?

    After completing BOLC, AMEDD Officers report to their initial active-duty assignment. Medical students return to their academic training following successful completion of BOLC.