Students with backpacks walking on a college campus Students with backpacks walking on a college campus

GI Bill

Gain access to one of the most compelling benefits in the military, which has helped Soldiers and veterans go to college and be able to explore a range of career opportunities.

Get Help Paying For College And More

College campus with a paver walkway and trees in the background College campus with a paver walkway and trees in the background

Education Benefits to Use While You Serve, And After

The GI Bill helps pay for college, graduate school, trainings, certifications, and more to support your career goals in and after the Army. You'll need to serve three years to access its full benefits.

  • College and university tuition
  • Online and part-time schooling
  • Licensing and certification courses
  • Vocational training and trade school
  • Entrepreneurship training
  • Flight school

The GI Bill Programs Available to You

A male Soldier sitting in front of a laptop in a classroom A male Soldier sitting in front of a laptop in a classroom

The Post-9/11 GI Bill

This program is the most widely used GI Bill option. It provides up to full college tuition for public and in-state schools, and more than $25,000 per year at private or foreign schools, as well as money for housing and books.

  • Monetary benefits increase the longer you serve and will not expire
  • You must serve at least 90 days as an active-duty Soldier to receive benefits
  • Offers monthly housing allowances and a stipend for books
  • Payments are made directly to the school

An Army Pilot standing next to a helicopter An Army Pilot standing next to a helicopter

The Montgomery GI Bill—Active Duty

Unlike the Post-9/11 GI Bill, benefit payments will be made directly to you, and you must serve active duty for at least two years. This option uses a combination of your own paycheck contributions and government funding to help pay for education benefits for up to 36 months.

  • Uses a combination of your paycheck contributions and government funding
  • You can use benefits while you serve or within ten years of completing service
  • Length of service, type of school or training program, and contributions will determine the amount to receive
  • Benefits are paid directly to you for every month you are enrolled

A Soldier adjusting the sleeve on his combat uniform A Soldier adjusting the sleeve on his combat uniform

The Montgomery GI Bill—Selected Reserve

This option is unique to part-time Soldiers in the Army Reserve and Army National Guard. It helps pay for education and training benefits for up to 36 months in return for six years of service.

  • Pays more than $400 in monthly tuition payments for 36 months
  • Must have a high school diploma or equivalent and complete initial training (Basic Training and Advanced Individual Training)
  • Benefits must be used during your service and cannot be used after your service ends

Two male Soldiers in combat uniform standing in front of a chain link fence Two male Soldiers in combat uniform standing in front of a chain link fence

More Ways to Cover College Costs

The GI Bill includes additional programs available to Soldiers during and after service.

Common Questions About the GI Bill

Does the GI Bill expire?

For the Post-9/11 GI Bill, it depends on when you were discharged from active duty. If your service ended on or after January 1, 2013, your benefits will not expire thanks to a law called the Forever GI Bill–Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act. If your service ended before January 1, 2013, your benefits will expire 15 years after your last separation date from active service.

For The Montgomery GI Bill–Active Duty, you usually have 10 years to use your benefits, depending on your situation.

For The Montgomery GI Bill–Selected Reserve, your eligibility usually ends the day you leave the Selected Reserve, but there are exceptions to this rule.

Can my spouse or child use my GI Bill? Is it transferable?

Yes, the Post-9/11 GI Bill allows you to transfer unused education benefits to immediate family members, including spouses and children. You must have at least six years of service and commit to an additional four years in order to transfer benefits.

Can I use my GI Bill to buy a house?

In some instances, you may claim your GI Bill as regular income to meet a lender’s requirements. However, not all lenders will let you use the GI Bill as regular income because it is often considered short-term.

Is GI Bill money considered income?

Payments you receive for education, training, or housing under any law administered by Veterans Affairs are tax-free and should not be included as income on your federal tax return.

How much is the Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) for the GI Bill?

You may be eligible for a monthly housing rate depending on factors such as the type of GI Bill program, the location of your school, length of your school or training program, and when you enrolled.

Is the GI Bill considered financial aid?

In most cases, a school's financial aid department does not consider the GI Bill financial aid. This means that you may be eligible for student loans, scholarships, and Pell Grants along with the GI Bill.

Talk To A Recruiter

Don’t worry, there’s no obligation if you reach out.

Thanks for reaching out,

Here's What Happens Next

  1. You'll receive an email confirming your request

  2. We'll provide additional information about next steps

  3. You'll work with us to decide whether the Army is right for you

Questions you may have right now

Who will reach out to me?

One of our recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

Who will reach out to me?

One of our ROTC recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

What will you ask me?

Our conversation will likely begin with some basic qualifying questions, like your age and education level. From there, the conversation will be about getting to know you and your goals for the future. Expect us to ask about your interests and skills so we can suggest Army jobs that might interest you.

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How can the Army help me pay for college?

Do I have to go to Basic Training?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How can the Army help me pay for college?

What is the time commitment for part-time service?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Can the Army help me pay for medical school?

Do I have to go to Basic Training?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How do I apply for ROTC scholarships?

How do I join ROTC at the college I want to attend?

Will I be expected to join if I talk to someone?

No. Our goal is to answer your questions and help you decide if the Army is a good option for you. We understand you may not be ready to join yet, or that we may not be the right fit, and that's fine. There's no obligation for talking to us.

Thanks for reaching out,

Here's What Happens Next

  1. You'll receive an email confirming your request

  2. We'll provide additional information about next steps

  3. You'll work with us to decide whether the Army is right for you

Questions you may have right now

Who will reach out to me?

One of our recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

What will you ask me?

Our conversation will likely begin with some basic qualifying questions, like your age and education level. From there, the conversation will be about getting to know you and your goals for the future. Expect us to ask about your interests and skills so we can suggest Army jobs that might interest you.

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Do I qualify to join the Army?

Can I join as an Officer?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Do I qualify to join the Army?

Can I join as an Officer?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

What type of health care jobs are available in the Army?

Can the Army help me pay for medical school?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Can I join ROTC at my age

Can I join as an Officer?

Will I be expected to join if I talk to someone?

No. Our goal is to answer your questions and help you decide if the Army is a good option for you. We understand you may not be ready to join yet, or that we may not be the right fit, and that's fine. There's no obligation for talking to us.

Thanks for reaching out, .

We admire you for considering such a big career decision at your age. Unfortunately, we're unable to directly reach out to you until you are at least sixteen years old and a junior in high school. However, the following ROTC info is something that may interest you now.

Questions you may have right now

How old do I have to be to serve in the Army full-time?

To become an enlisted Soldier, you must be 17 years old. To become an Army Officer, you must be at least 18 years old and have a college degree obtained either through ROTC, U.S. Military Academy at West Point, or from another college or university program. Learn more about Army Eligibility Requirements and how to receive Officer training while in college.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you

How do I apply for ROTC Scholarships?

Army ROTC has several scholarships available for college-bound high school students. Review your options at ROTC Scholarships, or immediately apply by creating an account at my.goarmy.com to get started.

How old do I have to be to serve in the Army part-time?

To become an enlisted Soldier, you must be 17 years old. To become an Army Officer, you must be at least 18 years old and have a college degree obtained either through ROTC, U.S. Military Academy at West Point, or from another college or university program. Learn more about Army Eligibility Requirements and how to receive Officer training while in college.

What are the ways to serve part-time?

You can serve part-time as a Soldier in the Army Reserve or the Army National Guard. By serving part-time, you are able to continue your college education or work a civilian job, while earning an extra paycheck and maintaining many of the benefits of military service.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you.

How do I become a health care provider in the Army?

You can serve part-time or full-time as you train in our health care program. Upon graduation of the program, you will enter the Army health care team as a Commissioned Officer.

What types of medical careers are available in the Army?

There are numerous health care careers available through the Army Medical Education Deparment (AMEDD), including physicians, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and many more. View your career options.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you.

What are the benefits of joining ROTC?

ROTC makes it possible to achieve your ambitions. Become a leader and serve your country in one of the nation's top leadership training programs. You can do this while maintaining your college curriculum and earning up to 100% tuition coverage. Upon graduation, you're guaranteed a career as an Army Officer.

How do I prepare to join ROTC?

When you're at least 16 years old and at least a high school junior, you can reach out to us, or even talk to your high school counselor. Together, we'll talk options and decide if ROTC is the right path for you.

Will I become an Officer if I complete ROTC?

Yes. After graduation, you are commissioned as a highly respected second lieutenant in the Army, entrusted with leading other Soldiers.

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