A group of Army Paratroopers sitting in a row with a US Flag in the background A group of Army Paratroopers sitting in a row with a US Flag in the background

Deployment

Understanding deployment can help ease any uncertainties you or your family may have.

OUR MISSION IS TO PREPARE YOU FOR YOURS

The Army not only ensures you are well-trained for any mission, but we offer resources to support your family, too.

A CH-47 Chinook helicopter lifts off sling-loading a Humvee and trailer during air assault training A CH-47 Chinook helicopter lifts off sling-loading a Humvee and trailer during air assault training

DEFINING DEPLOYMENT

Deployment is when you’re sent away from your assigned duty station to support a specific mission and you cannot bring your family.

Soldiers run in formation on a dusty path in sunlight. Soldiers run in formation on a dusty path in sunlight.

Every Soldier Is Trained to Succeed

Difficult and sometimes dangerous situations are a reality when it comes to deployment. You and your unit will build tactical and technical skills, as well as train under realistic and challenging conditions so your team is confident, effective, and ready for anything you might encounter.

Soldiers perform the strength deadlift exercise outside on a snowy evening Soldiers perform the strength deadlift exercise outside on a snowy evening

Experiences Are Different for Everyone

Deployments not only vary by mission, but they can also differ in how Soldiers experience them. Some Soldiers may find the unique opportunity and cultural aspects of deployment rewarding, whereas others may thrive on the camaraderie in more challenging environments.

A Solider uses his phone to FaceTime with his wife and watch their new-born daughter. A Solider uses his phone to FaceTime with his wife and watch their new-born daughter.

Contact Loved Ones While You’re Away

Soldiers are allowed and encouraged to stay in touch with family and friends during deployment to ensure a healthy morale, well-being, and peace of mind. However, there may be instances, depending on the mission, when access to communications is limited or you cannot discuss certain details for security reasons. Here are the different ways you can connect.

  • Email, phone calls, and text messages
  • Social media channels
  • Letters and care packages

“There's no doubt in my mind that the Army Reserve has prepared her for deployment—to teach her to be the best Soldier she can be.”

- Molly Anderson, Mother of Sgt. Autumn Anderson

A Soldier in combat uniform hugging his wife and child A Soldier in combat uniform hugging his wife and child

Support for Families

We offer services like counseling, support groups, financial management, and more to help Soldiers and their families adjust and cope with deployment.

“When I came back from deployment, I had this whole newfound concept of pride and knew what I wanted to do with my life… which was to be a Soldier.”

- Sgt. 1st Class Jean-Noel Howell

A contingent of paratroopers returning after a completed mission A contingent of paratroopers returning after a completed mission

What To Expect After Deployment

From the people you meet and friendships you make to the work you do and challenges you face, the experiences you have during deployment can have a lasting impact on your life and those around you.

A U.S. Army UH-60 takes off after dismounting Soldiers during a training event A U.S. Army UH-60 takes off after dismounting Soldiers during a training event

Navigating Challenges

Although we do our best to anticipate and minimize danger, there’s a risk that comes with being a Soldier in the Army, especially when deployments involve dangerous situations. The Army offers several programs that help evaluate, treat, and support ill or injured Soldiers through medical care, mental health services, rehabilitation, professional development, and more.

Common Questions

How often will I be deployed in my Army career?

There’s no way to predict if or how often you’ll be deployed in your Army career. You could be deployed at any time for a variety of reasons based on your Army unit’s skill sets.

Rest and recuperation, or R&R, may be authorized while you’re deployed. The Army also aims to balance a Soldier’s time deployed to their time at home, which is called Dwell Time.

How will I find out if I am being deployed?

Your unit commander will notify you if your unit has been selected to mobilize for deployment. Though sometimes unpredictable, commanders aim to give units as much notice as possible. You’ll get a checklist of everything you need to do to prepare, like putting your rent on hold or managing your finances.

Can I see family or friends during deployment?

No. Deployment is an instance where your family and friends cannot come with you or visit while you are away.

Can I volunteer for deployment?

Usually, most of your unit is deployed at the same time, with the exception of what’s called a rear detachment, or a portion of the unit that remains behind to fulfill other duties. However, there are some circumstances where you can be chosen to support special missions or volunteer for unique training opportunities.

Can Army civilians be deployed?

Yes. Since the United States has an all-volunteer force, Army civilians may be called upon to take on support roles that would have been previously filled by Soldiers during times of a draft.

What do Soldiers eat during deployment?

During deployment, Army culinary specialists use different foods, cooking techniques, and more mobile equipment to prepare meals. In some instances, Soldiers may need to eat MREs, or Meals Ready to Eat, which are prepackaged options that require less time and prep work to consume.

Talk to a Recruiter

Don’t worry, there’s no obligation if you reach out.

Thanks for reaching out,

Here's What Happens Next

  1. You'll receive an email confirming your request

  2. We'll provide additional information about next steps

  3. You'll work with us to decide whether the Army is right for you

Questions you may have right now

Who will reach out to me?

One of our recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

Who will reach out to me?

One of our ROTC recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

What will you ask me?

Our conversation will likely begin with some basic qualifying questions, like your age and education level. From there, the conversation will be about getting to know you and your goals for the future. Expect us to ask about your interests and skills so we can suggest Army jobs that might interest you.

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How can the Army help me pay for college?

Do I have to go to Basic Training?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How can the Army help me pay for college?

What is the time commitment for part-time service?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Can the Army help me pay for medical school?

Do I have to go to Basic Training?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

How do I apply for ROTC scholarships?

How do I join ROTC at the college I want to attend?

Will I be expected to join if I talk to someone?

No. Our goal is to answer your questions and help you decide if the Army is a good option for you. We understand you may not be ready to join yet, or that we may not be the right fit, and that's fine. There's no obligation for talking to us.

Thanks for reaching out,

Here's What Happens Next

  1. You'll receive an email confirming your request

  2. We'll provide additional information about next steps

  3. You'll work with us to decide whether the Army is right for you

Questions you may have right now

Who will reach out to me?

One of our recruiters will either call or email you to set up time to talk.

What will you ask me?

Our conversation will likely begin with some basic qualifying questions, like your age and education level. From there, the conversation will be about getting to know you and your goals for the future. Expect us to ask about your interests and skills so we can suggest Army jobs that might interest you.

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Do I qualify to join the Army?

Can I join as an Officer?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Do I qualify to join the Army?

Can I join as an Officer?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

What type of health care jobs are available in the Army?

Can the Army help me pay for medical school?

How can I prepare for the conversation?

While we'll ask you questions, this is your opportunity to ask some of your own. Here are a couple to get you started:

Can I join ROTC at my age

Can I join as an Officer?

Will I be expected to join if I talk to someone?

No. Our goal is to answer your questions and help you decide if the Army is a good option for you. We understand you may not be ready to join yet, or that we may not be the right fit, and that's fine. There's no obligation for talking to us.

Thanks for reaching out, .

We admire you for considering such a big career decision at your age. Unfortunately, we're unable to directly reach out to you until you are at least sixteen years old and a junior in high school. However, the following ROTC info is something that may interest you now.

Questions you may have right now

How old do I have to be to serve in the Army full-time?

To become an enlisted Soldier, you must be 17 years old. To become an Army Officer, you must be at least 18 years old and have a college degree obtained either through ROTC, U.S. Military Academy at West Point, or from another college or university program. Learn more about Army Eligibility Requirements and how to receive Officer training while in college.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you

How do I apply for ROTC Scholarships?

Army ROTC has several scholarships available for college-bound high school students. Review your options at ROTC Scholarships, or immediately apply by creating an account at my.goarmy.com to get started.

How old do I have to be to serve in the Army part-time?

To become an enlisted Soldier, you must be 17 years old. To become an Army Officer, you must be at least 18 years old and have a college degree obtained either through ROTC, U.S. Military Academy at West Point, or from another college or university program. Learn more about Army Eligibility Requirements and how to receive Officer training while in college.

What are the ways to serve part-time?

You can serve part-time as a Soldier in the Army Reserve or the Army National Guard. By serving part-time, you are able to continue your college education or work a civilian job, while earning an extra paycheck and maintaining many of the benefits of military service.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you.

How do I become a health care provider in the Army?

You can serve part-time or full-time as you train in our health care program. Upon graduation of the program, you will enter the Army health care team as a Commissioned Officer.

What types of medical careers are available in the Army?

There are numerous health care careers available through the Army Medical Education Deparment (AMEDD), including physicians, dentists, nurses, veterinarians, and many more. View your career options.

How can the Army help me pay for college?

There are a variety of options available to help you pursue education with flexibility, such as ROTC programs, the GI Bill, and other programs that help pay for college tuition, trade school, technical school, or trainings. View all of the Education Benefits available to you.

What are the benefits of joining ROTC?

ROTC makes it possible to achieve your ambitions. Become a leader and serve your country in one of the nation's top leadership training programs. You can do this while maintaining your college curriculum and earning up to 100% tuition coverage. Upon graduation, you're guaranteed a career as an Army Officer.

How do I prepare to join ROTC?

When you're at least 16 years old and at least a high school junior, you can reach out to us, or even talk to your high school counselor. Together, we'll talk options and decide if ROTC is the right path for you.

Will I become an Officer if I complete ROTC?

Yes. After graduation, you are commissioned as a highly respected second lieutenant in the Army, entrusted with leading other Soldiers.

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