Georgetown University
Cadets take an oath to “protect and defend the Constitution of the United States,” contracting them into the ROTC Advance Course. This is a very important moment in a cadet’s Army career; the cadet has made a binding promise to serve his or her country.

Cadets take their contracting oath

Cadets take an oath to “protect and defend the Constitution of the United States,” contracting them into the ROTC Advance Course. This is a very important moment in a cadet’s Army career; the cadet has made a binding promise to serve his or her country.

“ Hello, friend! My name is Daniel Feehan, and I was the Hoya Program’s Cadet Program Commander during the 2004-2005 academic year. I hail from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the finest state in the union. I was student at Georgetown University and graduated with a degree in International Politics and the study of American Foreign Policy. During my freshman year at Georgetown University, I chased women and refused to cut my hair. I loved college, but there was something nagging at me, something I kept remembering from the September of that year. The Hoya Program had an answer. At the end of my freshman year, I went to the offices of Georgetown Army ROTC. They worked hard and found me a three-year scholarship to Georgetown. Army ROTC has tested and developed my physical, mental, and intellectual capacities since the day I began. After my sophomore year, I traveled to Vermont as a candidate of the U.S. Army’s Mountain Warfare School. This school taught me the technical skill of military mountaineering, and the many ways to ascend or descend a mountain. As the Program Commander I was responsible for everything that happened or failed to happen in the training of 100 other college students. It was a huge responsibility, one I could only accept due to the leadership Army ROTC helped me develop. I train with a group of dedicated people, all of whom want to lead their country. In this environment, I was made responsible for people, equipment, successful training missions, and myself. I am motivated to succeed where I fail, and I am eager to take on new challenges. I have learned to deal with a fear of failure, and to demand the best of myself. As a cadet of the Hoya Program, you are given the chance to interact daily with the academic community and to engage in a discourse about why you choose to lead your country. And as a cadet, I still had time to chase women. Before I commissioned, as a senior, most of my college friends were looking for jobs. I already have a job, one that will take me to new, challenging places. My job, an officer in the U.S. Army, is leading my country in the world. I am honored and humbled by this position. I do not know what the future brings, but I am ready to face it. ”

2LT Daniel Feehan, Milwaukee, WI

STARTING YOUR CAREER

After you graduate from college, you will be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant. Your career as an Officer will be just beginning, and you'll find a variety of interesting Officer career fields, called branches, in the Army. Once you choose your Army branch, you will embark on specialized training.

Learn about Branches and Specialties on GoArmy.com

THE ARMY: IT'S WHAT YOU MAKE IT

Upon completion of Officer branch training and a first assignment, Army Officers may pursue additional specialized training and post-graduate education opportunities. You will most likely be assigned to advanced leadership positions and to staff positions. Also, you may develop doctrine, teach military tactics or serve as advisors.