Careers & Jobs
Military Intelligence Soldiers

Intelligence & Combat Support Careers

  • Soldier inserting bullets in a magazine.

    Ammunition Specialist (89B)

    Ammunition specialists are specialized Soldiers who are responsible for the management of ordnance (ammunition and explosives). They are tasked with receiving, storing and issuing conventional ammunition, guided missiles, large rockets, explosives and other ammunition and explosive related items.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier receives ammunition.

    Ammunition Stock Control and Accounting Specialist (89A)

    The ammunition stock control and accounting specialist operates the Standard Ammunition and Accounting System-Modernized computer hardware and software, and utilizes manual records to perform stock control and accounting procedures for ammunition, explosives and associated explosive components.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldiers verifying tracks for vehicles.

    Automated Logistical Specialist (92A)

    The automated logistical specialist is primarily responsible for supervising and performing management or warehouse functions in order to maintain equipment records and parts.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Officer (74A)

    A Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear officer commands the Army branch that specifically defends against the threat of CBRN weapons and Weapons of Mass Destruction. These officers lead an extraordinary chemical unit that is completely dedicated to protecting our nation.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Officer
    • Restrictions: None
  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Specialist (74D)

    Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Specialists are primarily responsible for defending the country against the threat of CBRN weapons and Weapons of Mass Destruction.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier speaks with a local child during a routine patrol.

    Civil Affairs Officer (38A)

    Civil affairs officers act as a liaison between the Army and civilian authorities and populations.

    The civil affairs officer combines regional expertise, language competency, political-military awareness, cross-cultural communication and professional military skills to conduct civil affairs operations and support civil-military operations in support of conventional and special operations forces.

    • Active/Reserve: Army Reserve
    • Officer/Enlisted: Officer
    • Restrictions: None
  • Civil Affairs Specialist speaking to villagers

    Civil Affairs Specialist (38B)

    Civil Affairs Specialists identify critical requirements needed by local citizens in combat or crisis situations. Civil Affairs Specialists are primarily responsible for researching, coordinating, conducting and participating in the planning and production of civil affairs related documents, while enabling the civil-military operations of the supported commander.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Army Officers Capt. JOhnson, Capt. Lee and LT. Jeudy

    Commissioned Officer Candidate (09S)

    Officers are the leaders of the Army. They lead from the front and adjust to environments that are always changing.

    To be an officer is to be respected as a Soldier and an inspiring leader — both within the Army and its community. Officers earn this honor because they’re trained to enhance personal and professional development of all whom they meet and work with.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Officer
    • Restrictions: None
  • Counterintelligence Agent (35L)

    Counterintelligence Special Agents conduct investigations and analysis to detect and counter foreign intelligence entities and international terrorist threats. They detect and identify the counterintelligence related inter threats and conduct the appropriate countermeasures.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldiers in a Cyber room.

    Cryptologic Cyberspace Intelligence Collector/Analyst (35Q)

    A Cryptologic Cyberspace Intelligence Collector/Analyst performs initial cryptologic digital analysis to establish target identification and operational patterns; identifies, reports, and maintains Intelligence information in support of Commander'€™s Intelligence Requirements and uses technical references to analyze information.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Cryptologic Linguist (35P)

    A cryptologic linguist is primarily responsible for identifying foreign communications using signals equipment. Their role is crucial as the nation’s defense depends largely on information that comes from foreign languages.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier preparing a meal.

    Culinary Specialist (92G)

    The culinary specialist is primarily responsible for the preparation and service of food in field or garrison food service operations.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • U.S. Army Diver jumping into water.

    Diver (12D)

    A diver performs tasks such as reconnaissance, demolition and salvage in underwater conditions. They specialize in either scuba diving (below the surface of water) or deep-sea diving (longer periods of time in depths up to 190 feet).

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • EOD Officer

    Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Officer (89E)

    The explosive ordnance disposal officer leads the Army's preeminent tactical and technical explosives experts. Explosive ordnance disposal officers are the culmination of the best tactical and technical training the Army and civilian academia can provide and lead organizations comprised of similar Soldiers. They are prepared to perform missions in support of Army units worldwide and across all operational environments.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Officer
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier with EOD robot.

    Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Specialist (89D)

    Explosive ordnance disposal specialist Soldiers are the Army's preeminent tactical and technical explosives experts. They are warriors who are properly trained, equipped and integrated to attack, defeat and exploit unexploded ordnance, improvised explosive devices and weapons of mass destruction.

    Explosive ordnance disposal specialists are the culmination of the best tactical and technical training the Army and civilian academia can provide. They are prepared to perform missions in support of Army units worldwide, across all operational environments.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Field Artillery Surveyor/Meteorological Crewmember (13T)

    The field artillery surveyor/meteorological crewmember is responsible for monitoring weather conditions so the field artillery team can fire and launch missiles accurately. Their role is crucial in the support of infantry and tank units during combat.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier training on the M777 towed 155 mm howitzers.

    Fire Control Repairer (91G)

    The fire control repairer is primarily responsible for supervising and performing maintenance on combat vehicles, and infantry and artillery fire control systems and equipment.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • 35G Soldiers using a computer.

    Geospatial Intelligence Imagery Analyst (35G)

    The geospatial intelligence imagery analyst is responsible for analyzing overhead and aerial imagery developed by photographic and electronic means. They provide Army personnel with critical information about enemy forces, potential battle areas and combat operations support.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Human Intelligence Collector (35M)

    The human intelligence collector is responsible for information collection operations. They provide Army personnel with information about the enemy force’s strengths, weaknesses and potential battle areas.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • 35F Soldier using a computer.

    Intelligence Analyst (35F)

    The intelligence analyst is primarily responsible for the analysis, processing and distribution of strategic and tactical intelligence. They are integral to providing Army personnel with information about enemy forces and potential battle areas.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Interpreter/Translator

    Interpreter/Translator (09L)

    The interpreter/translator is primarily responsible for interpreting and preparing translations between English and a foreign language.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldiers in a Cyber room.

    Military Intelligence Officer (35)

    The Army’s military intelligence is responsible for all collected intelligence during Army missions. They provide essential information that often save the Soldiers fighting on front lines.

    Military Intelligence Officers specialize in these specific areas:

    Imagery Intelligence: Collection and analysis of imagery using photogrammetry and terrain analysis.

    All-Source Intelligence: Performs collection management/surveillance/reconnaissance and provides advice.

    Counterintelligence: Provides coordination and participation in counterintelligence investigations, operations and production.

    Human intelligence: Controlled collection operations and interviews.

    Signals intelligence/electronic warfare: Collects signal intelligence and engages in electronic warfare.

    All-source intelligence aviator: Performs duties as an aviator/MI officer and participates in special electronic mission aircraft missions.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Officer
    • Restrictions: None
  • Ordnance Officer talking to an enlisted Soldier.

    Ordnance Officer (91A)

    Ordnance officers are responsible for ensuring that weapons systems, vehicles and equipment are ready and available — and in perfect working order — at all times. They also manage the developing, testing, fielding, handling, storage and disposal of munitions.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Officer
    • Restrictions: None
  • Psychological Operations Officer (37A)

    The Psychological Operations Officer has in-depth knowledge of the art and science of persuasion and influence, and an expertise in the political and cultural trends and attitudes of the people in his or her area of operation. Psychological Operations Officers utilize their understanding of social psychology, individual and group dynamics to influence individuals, groups and populations.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Officer
    • Restrictions: None
  • Officer and Soldiers

    Psychological Operations Specialist (37F)

    Psychological Operations Specialists are influence experts, who assesses the information needs of a target population and craft messaging to influence and engage target audiences.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • RADAR Repairer (94M)

    The radar repairer is an essential member of the Army communications maintenance team and performs maintenance on ground surveillance radar and associated equipment.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier directing base defense live fire training.

    Radio and Communications Security Repairer (94E)

    The radio/communications security repairer performs or supervises field and sustainment level maintenance on radio receivers, transmitters, communication security equipment, controlled cryptographic items and other associated equipment.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Signals Intelligence Analyst (35N)

    A signals intelligence analyst examines foreign communications/activity and relays that information by producing combat, strategic and tactical intelligence reports.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Small Arms/Artillery Repairer (91F)

    The small arms/artillery repairer is responsible for keeping a wide array of weapons — from small arms to field artillery and large ballistic missiles — operating properly.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Candidate (18X)

    Special Forces candidates are given the opportunity to become a member of one of the most highly skilled combat forces in the world. But they must complete and endure the extensive mental/physical training in order to join the Army elite.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Communications Sergeant (18E)

    Special Forces Communications Sergeants operate many kinds of communications gear, from encrypted satellite to high-frequency burst communications systems. They also have advanced computer and networking skills. The communications sergeant is responsible for establishing and maintaining tactical and operational communications.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Engineer Sergeant (18C)

    The Special Forces Engineer Sergeant is a construction and demolitions specialist. As a builder, the engineer sergeant can create bridges, buildings, and field fortifications. As a demolitions specialist, the engineer sergeant can carry out demolition raids against enemy targets, such as bridges, railroads, fuel depots, and critical components of infrastructure.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Assistant Operations and Intelligence Sergeant (18F)

    The Special Forces Intelligence Sergeant collects and processes intelligence, plans force protection, conducts threat vulnerability assessments, and is trained in photography, digital intelligence systems, biometrics, forensics and digital media exploitation.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Medical Sergeant (18D)

    Special forces medical sergeants are considered to be the finest first-response/trauma medical technicians in the world.

    Though they’re primarily trained with an emphasis on trauma medicine, they also have a working knowledge of dentistry, veterinary care, public sanitation, water quality and optometry.

    • Active/Reserve: Active Duty
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None
  • Soldier prepares a fuel supply line aboard the U.S. Army Landing Craft Utility 2031.

    Watercraft Operator (88K)

    Watercraft operators are primarily responsible for navigation, cargo operations and supervising other Soldiers on Army watercraft. They are part of a piloting team using electronic positioning systems, handheld navigation tools and traditional watch standing procedures aboard many of the Army’s watercraft.

    • Active/Reserve: Both
    • Officer/Enlisted: Enlisted
    • Restrictions: None