Army ROTC

Army ROTC And Undergraduate Nursing

Nursing students who are also Army ROTC Cadets can benefit from unique hands-on nursing opportunities while receiving financial assistance for college. You will gain valuable leadership experience and management training that can benefit you in either a military or private-sector nursing career.

Scholarships

Army ROTC program offers two-, three- or four-year scholarships for undergraduate nursing students. Contact your high school academic advisor or campus Military Science department for more information.

Nurse Summer Training Program (NSTP)

Nursing students who are also Army ROTC Cadets have an opportunity for a unique summer nursing experience. The paid, three-week Nurse Summer Training Program assigns Cadets to Army hospitals throughout the U.S. and Germany.

The program introduces you to the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) and to the roles and responsibilities of an Army Nurse Corps Officer. Under the supervision of an experienced Army Nurse Corps Officer, you will obtain hands-on experience. Your one-on-one clinical experience will allow you to hone your clinical skills, develop your problem-solving techniques and become comfortable with developing your professional skills as a member of the U.S. Army Healthcare Team.

AN ENHANCED EDUCATION

For Building Stronger Leaders

I always want to be somewhere that I am needed so the Army really needs nurses. I was interested in the Army, got accepted to the nursing school, and then joined ROTC at Georgetown to try it out for the first year and I loved it. I really saw that it is important not to start out my career with huge student loans over my head.

So I checked into the Army ROTC program and I found it as a good way to give back to the community through the Army and serve our Soldiers and also not get in to debt, so it was really a win-win situation for me. The commitment is eight years, the first four years are active, the second four years are optional Active or Reserve. I have a full ride four-year scholarship.

What drew me into the Army ROTC program was they were offering to pay for my education, four years of nursing as well as providing me room and board and a stipend. The Nurses summer training program is a program developed to show Cadets still in school getting there nursing degree what it is like transitioning from becoming a leader in the field environment to being a leader in the hospital-type environment.

I've had more experience here in two weeks then I have in two years of nursing school. And even though it is a training environment it eventually will become a reality. Critical care course is a very demanding course, there is a didactic or classroom phase, and then they have clinical rotation that they do also. Usually they work with second lieutenants or first lieutenant. They can give them a realistic first-hand view of what it's like to be a new Army officer in Army nurse school.

You start out and they teach you pretty much the basics the ranking system what they expect from you as an Officer, the Army values. If you want to learn how to do IV's, if you want to learn how to draw blood, you can do all of that and it's one on one, where as in a civilian hospital it's like eight people to one preceptor.

Your MS three year in Army ROTC is pretty much training to go to LDAC or Leadership Development Advanced Course. I actually wrapped up my military science year number four, and now for me it's passing the peak test and finishing up my degrees. It's just to get that final degree.