Road to Becoming a 68 Lima, Occupational Therapy Assistant

Staff Sergeant Georgiana Crittenden explains what it takes to be an Occupational Therapy Assistant in the U.S. Army.

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Transcript:

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“My name is Staff Sergeant Georgiana Crittenden. I’m a 68 Lima, Occupational Therapy Assistant in the U.S. Army.”

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“So when the patient comes in we’ll ask  a lot of questions as to what they have problems with, or what they cannot do that they used to be able to do before they had the pain.”

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“In occupational therapy, we’re trying to make them independent like they were before an injury, a surgery, or something happened. So we help with their functional, daily activities, whether it’s their occupation, their leisures.”

 

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“We help them with their daily activities as well, getting in and out of the bed, transfers, getting in and out of the tub, showering, how their supposed to get in and out of the car.”

 

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“Seeing how they’ve progressed and how we can help them every day is what I really enjoy.”

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“I went to Occupational Therapy Assistant school in San Antonio, Texas.”

“It’s all been pretty much at the expense of the Army. I haven’t had to pay for school.”

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“I went to school for 8 months which is four months in class and then four months on the job training at a facility and they taught us everything that we needed to know.”

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“I have taken college classes and I’m working towards my associates now.”

“I plan on continuing going to school because the Army pays for it and that’s just a great thing.”

“If and when I do get out of the Army, I can find a job on the outside with the certification that I have and the training that I have from being in the Army and in the occupational therapy field.”

[Soundbite Crittenden]

“To be able to know where I was going to go in life even after the Army, I will know where I’m going and so it’s kind of set up a path for me.”