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[MUSIC] BARISOFF: In my job, I work with different computer programs. I get analysis from satellite imagery, [INAUDIBLE VOICE ON RADIO], UAV imagery that was gathered by a drone. I'm Private First Class Taylor Barisoff. I'm a 12 Yankee Geospatial Engineer with the United States Army Reserve. A 12 Yankee is a terrain analyst and subject matter expert. One cool thing about analyzing all this data is you can find out so many interesting things. You're able to tell people where they would be able to land their UH-60 Blackhawk, where to move from there to the best ground cover and concealment. The information is so detailed. If I'm doing a 12 Yankee job here, I can tell you every spot that a sniper can see you. I'm gonna provide this intelligence to somebody who's gonna be there, boots on the ground, and if I give them the wrong information, that could affect lives. A lot of people think the Army is just fighting in trenches, infantrymen busting down doors, but it's not. There's reporters, military police, intelligence, analysts, the list goes on and on. When I first joined the Army Reserve and there was a 12 Yankee slot open, and the benefits that came along with it, the top secret security clearance, the signing bonus was a great opportunity and I didn't wanna pass that up. You join the Army, you don't even know what a geospatial engineer is, let alone that there's a market for jobs in the civilian sector for it. I'm constantly surprised by the amount of technology that the Army has at its fingertips. The things I've learned in the Army Reserve, I can take those and directly apply them to civilian life and civilian jobs. I was at a crossroads at the time I joined the Army Reserve. I was working three jobs to make ends meet, couldn't afford school. The Army Reserve turned my life around 180 degrees. It taught me how to work with integrity. I've always been a disciplined guy, but the Army Reserve taught me to be a leader. When you put on your uniform as a 12 Yankee, you put it on with pride, because you know you're doing something important. I love my job, but there's also something extra about serving your country. When I look in the mirror, I see somebody who's taking charge of their life, doing something that matters, and who has a firm and significant future ahead of them. [MUSIC]

Putting data to work: optimizing homeland security. 

I’m constantly surprised by the amount of technology the Army has at its fingertips.

NAME: PFC Taylor Barisoff
JOB: Geospatial Engineer (12Y)
SERVICE TYPE: Army Reserve

Both Army and civilian operations rely on the data, analyzed and distributed by Army geospatial engineers. Private First Class Taylor Barisoff reveals the life of one of these critical engineers.