University of Maine
The specific training you receive in Army ROTC will teach you things like leadership development, military skills and adventure training. This will take place both in the classroom and in the field, but you will maintain a normal academic schedule like all college students. The best part about this leadership development training? You will use and benefit from it for years to come.

UMaine Army ROTC Ranger Challenge Team competes against other university ROTC teams.

The specific training you receive in Army ROTC will teach you things like leadership development, military skills and adventure training. This will take place both in the classroom and in the field, but you will maintain a normal academic schedule like all college students. The best part about this leadership development training? You will use and benefit from it for years to come.

“ Army ROTC has been the most rewarding activity I have ever been involved in. I've met some of my best friends at the University of Maine and from across the country while participating in training that has challenged me both physically and mentally. Army ROTC gave me the motivation to focus on academics in a way that I had never done before and consequently made me a much better student. My experience with UMaine Army ROTC has exceeded every expectation I had coming into the program and has allowed me to exceed all the expectations I had for myself. ”

Cadet LTC Anders Hamlin, Cadet Battalion Commander, Milo, Maine

RANGER CHALLENGE

The Ranger Challenge is an opportunity for schools to "compete" with each other completing military tasks. In addition to a written examination where Cadets test their Army knowledge, there are physical fitness drills and field exercises. Battalions leave a Ranger Challenge with stronger bonds and sharper skills.

PERSHING RIFLES

The National Society of Pershing Rifles gives Army ROTC Cadets the opportunity to develop to the highest degree possible. Cadets can take part in precision trick rifle drill teams that provide them with the outstanding traits of leadership, military bearing and discipline.

Physical Training

Physical fitness is important to the Army.  Cadets at the University of Maine participate in physical training to promote a healthy lifestyle and prepare them for becoming an Army officer.  Freshman and sophomore cadets are encouraged to attend physical training.  Junior and senior cadets must attend the training.  Cadets are tested monthly to determine their fitness level using the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT).

 

Leadership Laboratories and Field Training Exercises

Leadership labs are taught monthly on a Saturday.  Cadets can focus on their academic studies during the week and this allows cadets from outer lying schools to attend easier.  One Field Training Exercise (FTX) occurs each semester.  These labs and FTX’s are an opportunity for cadets to practice the skills they are learning about in their ROTC classes.  FTX’s are between 24-96 hours in duration and occur during a weekend.  Freshman and sophomore cadets are welcome to attend; but are not required.  Attendance is mandatory for junior and senior cadets.

Ranger Challenge Team

Ranger Challenge is the varsity sport of Cadet Command in which all ROTC units in the United States compete each year against other universities in highly visible events requiring mastery of technical, tactical, and leadership skills. Squads of nine cadets are judged on teamwork, stamina, and proficiency in such soldier skills as marksmanship, orienteering, weapons assembly, hand grenade throw, Army Physical Fitness Test, and the ten-kilometer rucksack march. All events are conducted over a two-day period. Any cadet may try out for the Ranger Challenge Team.  The University of Maine Army ROTC Ranger Challenge Team is student-led and cadre supervised, and stresses physical fitness and survival training. Activities consist of weekend camping trips, backpacking, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, cold weather survival, and other rigorous outdoor activities.

Leadership Development and Assessment Course

Every Army ROTC Cadet who enters into the Advanced Course (junior and senior years) attends the Leader Development and Assessment Course. It's a four-week summer course to evaluate and train all Army ROTC Cadets. This course normally takes place between your junior and senior years of college, and is conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington.

Color Guard

The Black Bear Color Guard consists of a select group of Cadets who are given the honor of displaying and posting the colors of this great country. The Cadet Color Sergeant will coordinate this group of sharp, highly-trained, and motivated Cadets to participate in University and local ceremonies where they will display and post the colors. This distinguished group will learn the proper customs and courtesies associated with displaying, posting, and honoring the US flag. It will also be given the opportunity to represent Army ROTC within the community.

20th Maine Honor Society

The 20th Maine, the Military Honor Society of the First Maine Cadet Battalion, provides its membership with professional development through a program of seminars, research projects, and guest speakers on national defense subjects. The Society further seeks to aid the University and the community through cooperative assistance and community action projects. Membership consists of sophomore, junior, and senior cadets who have demonstrated outstanding leadership, high moral character, scholarship (both in Military Science and in other disciplines), and service to the ROTC program and the University.

National Honor Society of Scabbard & Blade

Scabbard and Blade is an Honor Society comprised of members of Army, Navy, and Air Force Cadets who demonstrate outstanding leadership abilities. Current members of the Society select candidates for membership. The Professors of Military Science of the three services then approve the candidates selected. Activities of the Society are both service and socially oriented.

Annual Army ROTC Military Ball

Once a year, the annual competitive drill was held at the Military Ball (first held in 1887) for entertainment of couples attending. The Military Ball was one of the major social events on campus. Because of the hall size, the number of people attending was limited to 200. A queen and court were selected, and designated as Honorary Colonel and Lieutenant Colonels, respectively. The completed construction of the Memorial Gymnasium brought a new era for the Military Ball. The 1933 Ball was called "the event of the Season. "  The Black Bear Battalion holds an annual Military Ball during the spring semester. Attendance is mandatory for contracted cadets. Various civilian dignitaries and members of the University community are normally in attendance.