John Carroll University
Cadets preparing an operations order for their next mission.

Operations Order

Cadets preparing an operations order for their next mission.

John Carroll University ROTC Battalion Intranet

Battalion History

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps began with the National Defense Act of 1916. This Act established the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, outlined a program of instruction, and authorized appointments as Second Lieutenants, Organized Reserve Corps, for those who completed the course.  The entry of the United States into World War I in 1917 put ROTC out of business "for the duration". After the War, ROTC was revived in the National Defense Act of 1920. As the wartime officers of the AEF of 1917-1918 dropped out of the Organized Reserve Corps, the post World War I graduates of ROTC took their place.

When war clouds again loomed, the ROTC concept paid off. By June 1941 (six months before Pearl Harbor), approximately 118,000 ROTC graduates had been commissioned. The graduating classes of 1942, 1943, and 1944 added another 34,000 Reserve Officers before the college program was once again suspended for the duration as Officer Candidate Schools became the principal source of new officers who had to be turned out on what amounted to a "crash" basis.  Record ROTC enrollments marked the years after World War II as 18,627 college- trained Reserve Officers marched from the campus to active duty from 1946 to 1950. In the 1950-53 Korean conflict, a new generation of ROTC-trained combat leaders earned battlefield immortality.  General Eisenhower said during this time, “This type of leadership is more needed n w than ever before. Lacking it, this country...the world...faces disaster."

In 1950, John Carroll University established a Transportation Corps unit of the ROTC.  Since the first cadet was sworn in as a second lieutenant in June 1951, more than 1,895 have received Army Reserve commissions, and over 150 have received Regular Army commissions.

From its founding in 1950 until 1969, the Basic ROTC course was mandatory at JCU.  In September 1969, students were given an option of taking either two years of physical education or the Basic ROTC course.   In the fall of 1973, there were two significant changes:  (1) The provision requiring enrollment in either a Military Science or Physical Education program was deleted from the curriculum.  Enrollment in Military Science became purely voluntary.  (2) For the first time in its history, the Army ROTC at JCU enrolled women.  In 1978, after having been affiliated with the Transportation Corps, the JCU ROTC program was redesignated as a General Military Science program.  In September of 1979, a Military Science curriculum was begun at Cleveland State University.  In 1986, two noteworthy events occurred:  (1) We became known officially as the Wolfpack Battalion. (2) A Ranger Company was established and the members took part in Ranger Challenge skills competition.

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps began with the National Defense Act of 1916. This Act established the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, outlined a program of instruction, and authorized appointments as Second Lieutenants, Organized Reserve Corps, for those who completed the course.  The entry of the United States into World War I in 1917 put ROTC out of business "for the duration". After the War, ROTC was revived in the National Defense Act of 1920. As the wartime officers of the AEF of 1917-1918 dropped out of the Organized Reserve Corps, the post World War I graduates of ROTC took their place.

When war clouds again loomed, the ROTC concept paid off. By June 1941 (six months before Pearl Harbor), approximately 118,000 ROTC graduates had been commissioned. The graduating classes of 1942, 1943, and 1944 added another 34,000 Reserve Officers before the college program was once again suspended for the duration as Officer Candidate Schools became the principal source of new officers who had to be turned out on what amounted to a "crash" basis.  Record ROTC enrollments marked the years after World War II as 18,627 college- trained Reserve Officers marched from the campus to active duty from 1946 to 1950. In the 1950-53 Korean conflict, a new generation of ROTC-trained combat leaders earned battlefield immortality.  General Eisenhower said during this time, “This type of leadership is more needed n w than ever before. Lacking it, this country...the world...faces disaster."

In 1950, John Carroll University established a Transportation Corps unit of the ROTC.  Since the first cadet was sworn in as a second lieutenant in June 1951, more than 1,895 have received Army Reserve commissions, and over 150 have received Regular Army commissions.

From its founding in 1950 until 1969, the Basic ROTC course was mandatory at JCU.  In September 1969, students were given an option of taking either two years of physical education or the Basic ROTC course.   In the fall of 1973, there were two significant changes:  (1) The provision requiring enrollment in either a Military Science or Physical Education program was deleted from the curriculum.  Enrollment in Military Science became purely voluntary.  (2) For the first time in its history, the Army ROTC at JCU enrolled women.  In 1978, after having been affiliated with the Transportation Corps, the JCU ROTC program was redesignated as a General Military Science program.  In September of 1979, a Military Science curriculum was begun at Cleveland State University.  In 1986, two noteworthy events occurred:  (1) We became known officially as the Wolfpack Battalion. (2) A Ranger Company was established and the members took part in Ranger Challenge skills competition.

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps began with the National Defense Act of 1916. This Act established the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, outlined a program of instruction, and authorized appointments as Second Lieutenants, Organized Reserve Corps, for those who completed the course.  The entry of the United States into World War I in 1917 put ROTC out of business "for the duration". After the War, ROTC was revived in the National Defense Act of 1920. As the wartime officers of the AEF of 1917-1918 dropped out of the Organized Reserve Corps, the post World War I graduates of ROTC took their place.

When war clouds again loomed, the ROTC concept paid off. By June 1941 (six months before Pearl Harbor), approximately 118,000 ROTC graduates had been commissioned. The graduating classes of 1942, 1943, and 1944 added another 34,000 Reserve Officers before the college program was once again suspended for the duration as Officer Candidate Schools became the principal source of new officers who had to be turned out on what amounted to a "crash" basis.  Record ROTC enrollments marked the years after World War II as 18,627 college- trained Reserve Officers marched from the campus to active duty from 1946 to 1950. In the 1950-53 Korean conflict, a new generation of ROTC-trained combat leaders earned battlefield immortality.  General Eisenhower said during this time, “This type of leadership is more needed n w than ever before. Lacking it, this country...the world...faces disaster."

In 1950, John Carroll University established a Transportation Corps unit of the ROTC.  Since the first cadet was sworn in as a second lieutenant in June 1951, more than 1,895 have received Army Reserve commissions, and over 150 have received Regular Army commissions.

From its founding in 1950 until 1969, the Basic ROTC course was mandatory at JCU.  In September 1969, students were given an option of taking either two years of physical education or the Basic ROTC course.   In the fall of 1973, there were two significant changes:  (1) The provision requiring enrollment in either a Military Science or Physical Education program was deleted from the curriculum.  Enrollment in Military Science became purely voluntary.  (2) For the first time in its history, the Army ROTC at JCU enrolled women.  In 1978, after having been affiliated with the Transportation Corps, the JCU ROTC program was redesignated as a General Military Science program.  In September of 1979, a Military Science curriculum was begun at Cleveland State University.  In 1986, two noteworthy events occurred:  (1) We became known officially as the Wolfpack Battalion. (2) A Ranger Company was established and the members took part in Ranger Challenge skills competition.

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps began with the National Defense Act of 1916. This Act established the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, outlined a program of instruction, and authorized appointments as Second Lieutenants, Organized Reserve Corps, for those who completed the course.  The entry of the United States into World War I in 1917 put ROTC out of business "for the duration". After the War, ROTC was revived in the National Defense Act of 1920. As the wartime officers of the AEF of 1917-1918 dropped out of the Organized Reserve Corps, the post World War I graduates of ROTC took their place.

When war clouds again loomed, the ROTC concept paid off. By June 1941 (six months before Pearl Harbor), approximately 118,000 ROTC graduates had been commissioned. The graduating classes of 1942, 1943, and 1944 added another 34,000 Reserve Officers before the college program was once again suspended for the duration as Officer Candidate Schools became the principal source of new officers who had to be turned out on what amounted to a "crash" basis.  Record ROTC enrollments marked the years after World War II as 18,627 college- trained Reserve Officers marched from the campus to active duty from 1946 to 1950. In the 1950-53 Korean conflict, a new generation of ROTC-trained combat leaders earned battlefield immortality.  General Eisenhower said during this time, “This type of leadership is more needed n w than ever before. Lacking it, this country...the world...faces disaster."

In 1950, John Carroll University established a Transportation Corps unit of the ROTC.  Since the first cadet was sworn in as a second lieutenant in June 1951, more than 1,895 have received Army Reserve commissions, and over 150 have received Regular Army commissions.

From its founding in 1950 until 1969, the Basic ROTC course was mandatory at JCU.  In September 1969, students were given an option of taking either two years of physical education or the Basic ROTC course.   In the fall of 1973, there were two significant changes:  (1) The provision requiring enrollment in either a Military Science or Physical Education program was deleted from the curriculum.  Enrollment in Military Science became purely voluntary.  (2) For the first time in its history, the Army ROTC at JCU enrolled women.  In 1978, after having been affiliated with the Transportation Corps, the JCU ROTC program was redesignated as a General Military Science program.  In September of 1979, a Military Science curriculum was begun at Cleveland State University.  In 1986, two noteworthy events occurred:  (1) We became known officially as the Wolfpack Battalion. (2) A Ranger Company was established and the members took part in Ranger Challenge skills competition.

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