Georgia State University
The Georgia State ROTC program has commissioned countless exceptional officers and has seen many more come through as Cadre. Above is former Professor of Military Science, now COL Kevin Anderson, watching the Ranger Challenge team compete. Our Cadre run the gamut from all branches of the Army, both officer and enlisted, and we have even had Cadre from the Marines. Our graduates have gone into every branch of the Army as well and one, LTC Leamond Stuart, even served as Professor of Military Science at Georgia State 16 years after receiving his commission.

A Rich History

The Georgia State ROTC program has commissioned countless exceptional officers and has seen many more come through as Cadre. Above is former Professor of Military Science, now COL Kevin Anderson, watching the Ranger Challenge team compete. Our Cadre run the gamut from all branches of the Army, both officer and enlisted, and we have even had Cadre from the Marines. Our graduates have gone into every branch of the Army as well and one, LTC Leamond Stuart, even served as Professor of Military Science at Georgia State 16 years after receiving his commission.

Panther Battalion Past

Our battalion was first formed as a Transportation Corps Unit in May, 1951 when GSU was known as the Atlanta Division of the University of Georgia. In the Fall Quarter of 1951, 319 cadets enrolled in ROTC, which had a cadre of four officers and four non-commissioned officers. In 1955 the GSU ROTC Department evolved into a general military science unit. Instead of training focused on training for the Army, the new curriculum’s purpose was to give cadets a general military education. The program’s structure, a 2-year basic course and 2-year advanced course, has remained intact to date.

GSU ROTC enrollment surpassed 1000 cadets during the Korean War and nearly reached that level again during the Vietnam War. During this time all male, full-time undergraduate students were required to participate in the program if they had no prior military service and met the physical, age, and other eligibility criteria. As a result, enrollment in Military Science was always greater in those early years than it has been of late.  During the early 1970’s, ROTC enrollment at GSU declined when the ROTC requirement was lifted and the all-volunteer system was initiated.

Present

Enrollment in ROTC ran relatively low for the early part of the last decade, but with new Cadre, extensive recruiting efforts, and the addition of our sister schools, the program has seen a sudden boost in enrollment over the past couple of years.  In 2006, official enrollment was as low as 30, but today the program stands poised to break more than 100 Cadets in the coming year.  Before, our Cadre had offices only at Georgia State, but today we have offices at Georgia State, Morehouse, and Clayton State.  Whereas just a few years ago the program had to struggle to find available Cadre for training, today’s primary task is fitting everyone in one room and figuring out where that room should be.  Recent graduates are stationed anywhere from Korea, to Hawaii, to Germany.

Future

As the program gains more numbers, strength, and recognition on campus, we will continue to grow in terms of both size and quality.  Though recruiting efforts are always important to us, our Cadre and Cadets know that before anything else, we must ensure that our Cadets will begin their service well-trained and fully-prepared to take on one of the most challenging jobs in the world.  No other profession asks as much from recent college graduates as does that of the United States Army Officer Corps, and this fact will certainly never be lost on the Cadre and Cadets of the Panther Battalion.