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Army prospect happy with her ASVAB test scores

Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT DOES THE ASVAB MEASURE?

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery measures your knowledge and ability in ten different areas. It is not an IQ test, but the ASVAB does help the Army assess which jobs you are best suited to perform.

HOW CAN I PRACTICE FOR THE ASVAB?

You don’t have to go through any special preparation to take the ASVAB. Getting a good night’s rest and arriving on time are the two most important steps you can take to prepare.

WHO GIVES THE ASVAB, AND WHERE CAN I TAKE IT?

The ASVAB is usually given in schools by test administrators from the federal government. Schools determine where and when the ASVAB will be given. See your academic advisor for more information. If you’re not currently in school, contact your local recruiter for more information on ASVAB requirements and testing locations. You may now also take an unproctored version of the ASVAB test, called the PiCAT, at home at your own convenience.

WHAT IS THE PiCAT?

The Pending Internet Computerized Adaptive Test (PiCAT) is an alternative to current ASVAB testing procedures. It is an unproctored, full version of the ASVAB you may take on your own time. In order to take this test, you will need to contact a local recruiter in order to register and receive an access code. After completing the test, you may contact your recruiter in order to find out your score. If you choose to enlist, your PiCAT score will be validated at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) with a proctored verification test that will take 25-30 minutes.

WHAT CAN I EXPECT ON THE DAY OF THE TEST?

The ASVAB consists of ten short tests to complete during three hours or less. An ASVAB test administrator will give you instructions and tell you how long you have to complete each test. However, before you begin, you will have a chance to answer some practice questions and ask any questions about taking the test.

WHAT KIND OF QUESTIONS WILL I BE ASKED ON THE ASVAB?

The ASVAB tests cover general science, arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, numerical operations, coding speed, auto and shop information, mathematics knowledge, mechanical comprehension and electronics information.

WHAT SCORE DO I NEED TO PASS THE ASVAB? WHAT DO MY SCORES MEAN, AND HOW ARE THEY USED?

While there is no "failing" the ASVAB, you will need to score at least a 31 on the exam to be considered for enlistment in the Army. Your scores will be provided to you on a report called the ASVAB Student Results Sheet, with additional information to help you understand your score.

Understanding the asvab test areas

The ASVAB is a series of tests developed by the Department of Defense and is used by the U.S. Army to determine whether you have the mental aptitude to enlist. The ASVAB also helps determine which Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) you qualify for. The ASVAB is required to enlist in the U.S. Army and is valid for two years. The ASVAB may be given in a computerized version at a Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) or in a paper version at various Military Entrance Test (MET) sites around the country or at high schools and colleges. 

ASVAB Test Areas

  • General Science - measures knowledge of life science, earth and space science, and physical science
  • Arithmetic Reasoning - measures ability to solve basic arithmetic word problems
  • Word Knowledge - measures ability to understand the meaning of words through synonyms
  • Paragraph Comprehension - measures ability to obtain information from written material
  • Mathematics Knowledge - measures knowledge of mathematical concepts and applications
  • Electronics Information - measures knowledge of electrical current, circuits, devices and electronic systems
  • Auto and Shop Information - measures knowledge of automotive maintenance and repair, and wood and metal shop practices
  • Mechanical Comprehension - measures knowledge of the principles of mechanical devices, structural support and properties of materials
  • Assembling Objects - measures ability with spatial relationships
 

 

ASVAB Scores and AFQT scores

The AFQT score is the most important ASVAB score, because it determines if you can enlist in the U.S. Army. However, the U.S. Army also converts the ASVAB test scores into 10 other composite score areas known as "line scores" that determine what MOS an individual may qualify for. Listed below are the parts of the ASVAB that affect your AFQT test scores and each of the ten line scores.

  • Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) - Paragraph Comprehension, Word Knowledge, Mathematics Knowledge, and Arithmetic Reasoning.
  • Clerical (CL) – Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning and Mathematics Knowledge.
  • Combat (CO) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • Electronics (EL) – General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge and Electronic Information.
  • Field Artillery (FA) - Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • General Maintenance (GM) – General Science, Auto & Shop, Mathematics Knowledge and Electronics Information.
  • General Technical (GT) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension and Arithmetic Reasoning (AR).
  • Mechanical Maintenance (MM) – Auto & Shop, Mechanical Comprehension and Electronic Information.
  • Operators and Food (OF) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • Surveillance and Communications (SC) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • Skilled Technical (ST) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, General Science, Mechanical Comprehension and Mathematics Knowledge.
 
 

  • Army Officers Capt. JOhnson, Capt. Lee and LT. Jeudy

    Commissioned Officer Candidate (09S)

    Officers are the leaders of the Army. They lead from the front and adjust to environments that are always changing.

    To be an officer is to be respected as a Soldier and an inspiring leader — both within the Army and its community. Officers earn this honor because they’re trained to enhance personal and professional development of all whom they meet and work with.

  • warrant officer cadet

    Warrant Officer Corps (09W)

    As the technical experts in the Army, warrant officers manage and maintain many of the Army’s combat systems, vehicles and networks. Once they reach the rank of chief warrant officer two, they are commissioned by the president and receive the same status as a commissioned officer.

  • Soldiers training in a field.

    Infantryman (11B)

    The infantry is the main land combat force and backbone of the Army. They are responsible for defending our country against any threat by land, as well as capturing, destroying and repelling enemy ground forces.

  • Soldiers firing a mortar.

    Indirect Fire Infantryman (11C)

    The indirect fire infantryman is a member of a mortar squad, section or platoon. The mortar has the most power and range of any weapon in an infantry unit.

  • Soldiers training in a field.

    Infantryman (11X)

    The infantry is the main land combat force and backbone of the Army. It’s also the starting point for many advanced schools such as: Special Forces, Airborne School, Ranger School, Sniper School, and Pathfinder School.

  • Engineer Soldiers performing basic demolition.

    Combat Engineer (12B)

    Combat engineers primarily supervise, serve or assist as a member of a team when they are tackling rough terrain in combat situations. They provide their expertise in areas such as mobility, countermobility, survivability and general engineering.

  • Bridge Crewmembers building an Improved Ribbon Bridge (IRB).

    Bridge Crewmember (12C)

    Bridge crewmembers provide bridge and rafting support for dry and wet gap crossing operations when a squad, section or platoon tackles rough terrain in combat situations.

  • U.S. Army Diver jumping into water.

    Diver (12D)

    A diver performs tasks such as reconnaissance, demolition and salvage in underwater conditions. They specialize in either scuba diving (below the surface of water) or deep-sea diving (longer periods of time in depths up to 190 feet).

  • Quarrying Specialist (12G)

    Quarry specialists help construct airfields, roads, dams and buildings by moving tons of earth/materials with heavy types of machinery.

    They operate powered machines that are used in cleaning, crushing, drilling, grading and detonating rock at construction sites.

  • Soldier drilling into the foundation of a multipurpose building being built.

    Plumber (12K)

    Army plumbers and pipe fitters are responsible for installing and repairing plumbing and pipe systems.

  • U.S. Army Firefighters putting out a fire.

    Firefighter (12M)

    Army firefighters are responsible for protecting lives and property from fire. They control fires and help prevent them in buildings, aircrafts and ships.

  • Soldier operating a grader.

    Horizontal Construction Engineer (12N)

    Horizontal construction engineers use bulldozers, cranes, graders and other heavy equipment to move tons of earth and material to complete construction projects for the Army.

    They are also responsible for operating tractors with dozer attachments, scoop loaders, backhoe loaders, hydraulic excavators, motorized graders and scrapers.

  • Soldier installing a light fixture.

    Prime Power Production Specialist (12P)

    The prime power production specialist performs electrical assessments, facilities maintenance and quality assurance/quality control operations. He or she supervises, operates, installs and performs direct support/general support-level maintenance on electric power plants, consisting of prime power generator sets of 500 KW and higher along with associated auxiliary systems and equipment. Other duties include serving as LNO and technical advisor to FEMA and other federal organizations.

  • Soldiers assess an area.

    Power Distribution Specialist (12Q)

    The  power distribution specialist is primarily responsible for the electrical distribution system in the Army.

  • Interior Electrician (12R)

    The interior electrician is primarily responsible for the installation and maintenance for all of the Army’s interior electrical systems.

  • Technical Engineer (12T)

    The technical engineer supervises or participates in construction site development in areas such as technical investigation, surveys, drafts and construction plans/specifications. They conduct land surveys, make maps and prepare detailed plans for construction projects.

  • Soldier smooths a wet concrete surface .

    Concrete and Asphalt Equipment Operator (12V)

    Concrete and asphalt equipment operators are responsible for supervising or operating all equipment used in concrete and asphalt production, which is integral to the construction of airfields, roads, dams and buildings.

  • Soldier using a circular saw to cut a board to size.

    Carpentry and Masonry Specialist (12W)

    A carpentry and masonry specialist is responsible for general heavy carpentry and masonry duties.

  • Geospatial Engineer (12Y)

    Geospatial engineers are responsible for using geographic data that supports military/civilian operations for Disaster Relief and Homeland Security. They collect, analyze and distribute geospatial information to represent the terrain and its possible effects.

  • Cannon Crewmember working on equipment.

    Cannon Crewmember (13B)

    Cannon crewmembers work the howitzer cannons that support infantry and tank units during combat, and play crucial roles in the Army’s success on the battlefield.

  • Soldier operating a laser range finder.

    Joint Fire Support Specialist (13F)

    The joint fire support specialist is primarily responsible for the intelligence activities of the Army’s field artillery team.

  • Fire Control Specialist (13J)

    The fire control specialist integrates and processes tactical battlefield information from multiple users and sensors through a network of Army and JOINT automated battle command systems.

  • Multiple Launch Rocket System

    Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS/HIMARS) Crewmember (13M)

    A multiple launch rocket system crewmember is responsible for operating and maintaining the entire multiple launch rocket system. They support infantry and tank units by supplementing cannon artillery during combat.

  • Soldier putting away ammo.

    Field Artillery Firefinder RADAR Operator (13R)

    The field artillery firefinder radar operator is responsible for detecting enemy forces and alerting the units in the Army. Using a “firefinder” — which are highly specialized radars — they can detect various objects and their locations.

  • PATRIOT Fire Control Enhanced Operator/Maintainer (14E)

    A Patriot Fire Control Enhanced Operator/Maintainer operates and maintains one of the world’s most advanced missile systems – Patriot; the center piece weapon system of the Army’s air defense mission against multiple air threats to include ballistic missile, cruise missiles, and aircraft of all types. The 14E is responsible for operating and maintaining the five major parts of the Patriot Fire Control system: Radar Set, Engagement Control Station, Electronic Power Plant, Antenna Mast Group, and Battle Command Post. The 14E Soldier is also responsible for identifying, tracking, and combating those identified threats using a technology advanced interceptor missile that is capable of destroying enemy air threats at a moment’s notice.

  • Air Defense Battle Management System Operator (14G)

    The Air Defense Battle Management System Operator maintains, manages and operates modern complicated military computers on complex networks, communications equipment systems, and the Sentinel Radar in order to provide warning, detection, and protection for armed forces from aerial attack, missile attack, and aerial surveillance. Soldiers are responsible for integrating all air defense detection assets and firing units, maintaining tactical computer data links/networks that provide situational awareness, communication of detected threats throughout the air defense network, and serves as an air defense liaison to other services in all combat environments involving air defense.

  • Air Defense Enhanced Early Warning System Operator (14H)

    The Air Defense Enhanced Early Warning Systems Operator evaluates and communicates critical data about incoming enemy aerial and missile attacks and aerial surveillance by operating, maintaining and managing modern complicated military computers on complex networks, and utilizing sophisticated communications equipment. These Soldiers are responsible for the preparation and deployment of air defense equipment and systems, setup of a unit command post, establishing communication and network interoperability and integrating with Allied, Joint service and other Air Defense units.

    The 14H Soldier maintains computer data links and networks that provide early detection and tracking of possible air threats from the earth’s surface to space, providing the units with situational awareness and current air threat data which enable their engagement and destruction by Air Defense units.  They also serve as an air defense liaison to other services in all combat environments involving air defense.

  • Air and Missile Defense (AMD) Crewmember (14P)

    The Air and Missile Defense Crewmember operates and maintains three of the Army’s surface-to-air advanced weapons systems, which provide mobile, short-range air defense protection against cruise missiles and other threats.

    The crewmember is responsible for transporting and maintaining several weapons systems, including the counter-rocket artillery and mortar, and the Avenger missile system. He is also responsible for reloading and resupplying these weapons systems as well as tracking, identifying and destroying ground-based enemy threats.

  • Avenger Crewmember (14S)

    An Avenger Crewmember operates and maintains an Army surface-to-air missile system, designed to provide protection  against cruise missiles, and low-flying aircraft. The crewmember is responsible for operating and maintaining the Avenger system, which consists of eight STINGER missiles enclosed inside of two missile pods. It is also combined with a remotely fired .50 cal machine gun that is mounted to a Humvee.

  • PATRIOT Launching Station Enhanced Operator/Maintainer (14T)

    A Patriot Launching Station Enhanced Operator-Maintainer, is in charge of one of the world’s most advanced missile systems: the Patriot. The Patriot system is the center piece weapon system against multiple air threats, including  ballistic missiles, cruise missiles and aircraft. The operator-maintainer is responsible for operating and maintaining the Patriot Launching Station, which includes transporting, emplacement, electronic and maintenance.

    The 14T is also responsible for the transport, preparation and loading of technologically advanced interceptor missiles that ensure the Patriot missile system is capable of tracking, launching, and destroying enemy air threats at a moment’s notice.

  • Aircraft Powerplant Reparier

    Aircraft Powerplant Repairer (15B)

    The aircraft power plant repairer is primarily responsible for supervising, inspecting and performing maintenance on aircraft turbine engines and components. With hundreds of Army missions depending on airplanes and helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Aircraft Powertrain Repairer (15D)

    The aircraft powertrain repairer is primarily responsible for supervising, inspecting and performing maintenance on aircraft powertrain systems. With hundreds of Army missions depending on airplanes and helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Unmanned Aircraft Systems Repairer (15E)

    The unmanned aircraft repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance functions on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. They keep the aircrafts ready to fly and ensure their ability to collect and transmit information.

  • Soldier working on a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter.

    Aircraft Electrician (15F)

    The aircraft electrician is primarily responsible for supervising, inspecting and performing maintenance on aircraft electrical systems. They ensure that the electrical systems on airplanes and helicopters are properly maintained and repaired.

  • Aircraft Structural Repairer (15G)

    The aircraft structural repairer is primarily responsible for supervising and performing maintenance on aircraft structures. With hundreds of Army missions depending on airplanes and helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Soldiers preparing a helicopter for flight.

    Aircraft Pneudraulics Repairer (15H)

    The aircraft pneudraulics repairer is primarily responsible for supervising and performing maintenance on aircraft pneudraulics systems. With hundreds of Army missions depending on airplanes and helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • OH-58D Armament / Electrical / Avionics Systems Repairer (15J)

    The aircraft armament/missile systems repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of electrical, mechanical and pneudraulics systems associated with aircraft armament and missile and fire control systems.

  • Soldier repairing a Apache helicopter inside a hangar.

    Avionic Mechanic (15N)

    The avionic mechanic performs maintenance on tactical-communications-security, communication, navigation and flight control equipment.

  • Soldier preparing a flight plan.

    Aviation Operations Specialist (15P)

    The aviation operations specialist is primarily responsible for scheduling and dispatching tactical aircraft missions. They help operate one of the largest fleets of aircraft in the world and keep them running safe and efficient.

  • Soldier checking the communication equipment in an AN/TSW-7A mobile air traffic control tower.

    Air Traffic Control (ATC) Operator (15Q)

    The air traffic control operator is responsible for tracking planes and giving them landing and takeoff instructions at air traffic control facilities.

  • Soldier working on an AH-64 Apache helicopter.

    AH-64 Attack Helicopter Repairer (15R)

    The AH-64 attack helicopter repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of the AH-64 attack helicopters (also known as the “Apache”). With hundreds of Army missions depending on these helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Kiowa Warrior Helicopters

    OH-58D Helicopter Repairer (15S)

    The OH-58D Helicopter Repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of the OH-58D helicopters (also known as the “Kiowa Warrior”). With hundreds of Army missions depending on these helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • UH-60 Helicopter Repairer (15T)

    The UH-60 helicopter repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of the UH-60 Helicopters (also known as the “Black Hawk”). With hundreds of Army missions depending on these helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • chinook helicopter on edge of cliff

    CH-47 Helicopter Repairer (15U)

    The CH-47 helicopter repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of the CH-47 Helicopters (also known as the “Chinook”). With hundreds of Army missions depending on these helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Unmanned Aircraft Systems Operator (15W)

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems Operators are remote pilots of unmanned observation aircrafts, aka military drones, or UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) that gather intelligence used in operational tactics. Our drone operators are intelligence specialists; they are integral to providing Army personnel with information about enemy forces and battle areas.

  • AH-64 Armament/Electrical/Avionic Systems Repairer (15Y)

    The AH-64 Armament/Electrical/Avionic Systems Repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of AH-64 helicopters, twin-engine attack aircraft. With hundreds of Army missions depending on these helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Cyber Operations Specialist (17C)

    Cyber Operations Specialists conduct integrated and synchronized offensive cyberspace operations by targeting enemy and hostile adversary activities and capabilities. These specialists also conduct defensive operations to protect data, networks, net-centric capabilities, and other designated systems. They are responsible for detecting, identifying, and responding to attacks against friendly networks with other lethal and nonlethal actions that enable commanders to gain an advantage in cyberspace, across all domains.

  • Soldiers inside of a Cyber room.

    Electronic Warfare Specialist (17E)

    The Electronic Warfare Specialist advises and assists the commander on electronic warfare operations. This person makes use of electromagnetic and directed energy to control the electromagnetic spectrum (EMS) and defeat the enemy through planning, coordination, integration, and execution of electronic attack (EA), electronic protection (EP), and electronic support (ES).

  • Special Forces Soldier shooting

    Special Forces Weapons Sergeant (18B)

    Special Forces Weapons Sergeants employ U.S. and foreign small arms, light and heavy crew served weapons, anti-aircraft and anti-armor weapons.  They are also relied upon to control and supervise tactical offensive and defensive operations as well as perform various airborne operations.

  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Engineer Sergeant (18C)

    The Special Forces Engineer Sergeant is a construction and demolitions specialist. As a builder, the engineer sergeant can create bridges, buildings, and field fortifications. As a demolitions specialist, the engineer sergeant can carry out demolition raids against enemy targets, such as bridges, railroads, fuel depots, and critical components of infrastructure.

  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Medical Sergeant (18D)

    Special Forces Medical Sergeants are considered to be the finest first-response/trauma medical technicians in the world.

    Though they’re primarily trained with an emphasis on trauma medicine, they also have a working knowledge of dentistry, veterinary care, public sanitation, water quality and optometry.

  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Communications Sergeant (18E)

    Special Forces Communications Sergeants operate many kinds of communications gear, from encrypted satellite to high-frequency burst communications systems. They also have advanced computer and networking skills. The communications sergeant is responsible for establishing and maintaining tactical and operational communications.

  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Intelligence Sergeant (18F)

    The Special Forces Intelligence Sergeant collects and processes intelligence, plans force protection, conducts threat vulnerability assessments, and is trained in photography, digital intelligence systems, biometrics, forensics and digital media exploitation.

  • Special Forces Soldiers pulling security during a dismounted reconnaissance.

    Special Forces Candidate (18X)

    Special Forces candidates are given the opportunity to become a member of one of the most highly skilled combat forces in the world. They must complete and endure the extensive mental/physical training in order to join the Army elite.

  • U.S. Army Cavalry Scout using radio.

    Cavalry Scout (19D)

    The cavalry scout is responsible for being the eyes and ears of the commander during battle. They engage the enemy in the field, track and report their activity and direct the employment of weapon systems to their locations.

  • Soldiers firing the M1A1-SA Abrams Tank.

    M1 Armor Crewman (19K)

    The M1 armor crewman is responsible for operating armored equipment such as the M1A2 Abrams to destroy enemy positions. As part of the tank and armor unit, they are ready to defend our country anywhere in the world.

  • Soldier working on a satellite.

    Information Technology Specialist (25B)

    Information technology specialists are responsible for maintaining, processing and troubleshooting military computer systems/operations.

  • Radio Operator-Maintainer (25C)

    Radio operator-maintainers are responsible for the maintenance of radio communication equipment. This equipment needs to consistently work in order for the Army to direct the movement of its troops.

  • U.S. Army Cyber Network Defenders

    Cyber Network Defender (25D)

    The cyber network defender performs specialized computer network defense duties, including infrastructure support, incident response, auditing and managing. The cyber network defender also protects against and detects unauthorized activity in the cyberspace domain and uses a variety of tools to analyze and respond to attacks.

  • Cable Systems Installer-Maintainer

    Cable Systems Installer-Maintainer (25L)

    Cable systems installer-maintainers are primarily responsible for the maintenance of cable/wire communications systems, communication security devices and other associated equipment. This equipment needs to consistently work in order for the Army to direct the movement of its troops

  • Soldier taking a photo.

    Multimedia Illustrator (25M)

    Multimedia illustrators are primarily responsible for operating multimedia-imaging equipment in order to produce visual displays and documents. They produce graphic artwork that is used in Army publications, signs, charts, posters, television and motion picture productions.

  • Soldier checking the network status.

    Nodal Network Systems Operator-Maintainer (25N)

    The nodal network systems operator-maintainer is responsible for making sure that the lines of communication are always up and running. They maintain strategic and tactical nodal systems.

  • Soldiers setting up a microwave communication system.

    Microwave Systems Operator-Maintainer (25P)

    Microwave systems installer-maintainers are primarily responsible for installing, operating and maintaining microwave communications systems. They also work with associated antennas, multiplexing and communications security equipment.

  • Multichanel Transmission Systems Operator Maintainer

    Multichannel Transmission Systems Operator-Maintainer (25Q)

    A multichannel transmission systems operator-maintainer works directly on equipment that communicates through more than one channel. They are responsible for the maintenance check of these devices, antennas and associated equipment.

  • Soldier preparing to capture images of a training event.

    Visual Information Equipment Operator-Maintainer (25R)

    A visual information equipment operator-maintainer is responsible for installing, operating, maintaining and performing unit and higher levels of maintenance on visual information equipment and systems. 

  • Soldier preforms preventative checks and maintenance on a satellite communication system.

    Satellite Communication Systems Operator-Maintainer (25S)

    Satellite communication systems operator-maintainers are responsible for making sure that the lines of communication are always up and running. They maintain the multichannel satellite communications for the entire Army.

  • Soldier does a voice and data radio check using high frequency radio equipment.

    Signal Support Systems Specialist (25U)

    Signal support systems specialists are primarily responsible for working with battlefield signal support systems and terminal devices. This equipment needs to consistently work in order for the Army to direct the movement of its troops.

  • Soldier preparing to capture images of a training event.

    Combat Documentation / Production Specialist (25V)

    Combat documentation/production specialists are primarily responsible for supervising, planning and operating electronic and film-based still, video and audio acquisition equipment in order to document combat and noncombat operations.

  • U.S. Army Paralegal Specialist

    Paralegal Specialist (27D)

    The paralegal specialist is not like being a legal assistant, they are expected to provide legal/administrative support in all areas of criminal law, international law, civil/administrative law, contract law and fiscal law. They assist judges, Judge Advocates and unit commanders with a wide range of legal matters and judicial work.

  • U.S. Army Military Police Officers

    Military Police (31B)

    Military police protect the lives and property on Army installations by enforcing military laws and regulations. They also control traffic, prevent crime and respond to all emergencies.

  • CID agent at firing range

    Criminal Investigations Special Agent (31D)

    CID special agents are primarily responsible for conducting criminal investigations in which the Army is, or may be, a party of interest. They handle felony-level crimes that involve Army property and Army personnel.

  • 31E Soldier talking to a security Military Police Soldier.

    Internment/Resettlement Specialist (31E)

    Internment/resettlement specialists are primarily responsible for day-to-day operations in a military confinement/correctional facility or detention/internment facility.

  • Military Dog Handler with her service dog.

    Military Working Dog Handler (31K)

    Military Working Dog (MWD) handlers are responsible for the care and training of his or her service dog, which contributes to combat operations abroad and installation security at home by providing target odor detection (explosive/drug). Service dogs, generally seen as a non-lethal option for neutralizing a threat, also serve as a psychological deterrent during law enforcement operations.  

  • 35F Soldier using a computer.

    Intelligence Analyst (35F)

    The intelligence analyst is primarily responsible for the analysis, processing and distribution of strategic and tactical intelligence. They are integral to providing Army personnel with information about enemy forces and potential battle areas.

  • Geospatial Intelligence Imagery Analyst (35G)

    The geospatial intelligence imagery analyst is responsible for analyzing overhead and aerial imagery developed by photographic and electronic means. They provide Army personnel with critical information about enemy forces, potential battle areas and combat operations support.

  • Counterintelligence Agent (35L)

    Counterintelligence Special Agents conduct investigations and analysis to detect and counter foreign intelligence entities and international terrorist threats. They detect and identify the counterintelligence related inter threats and conduct the appropriate countermeasures.

  • Human Intelligence Collector (35M)

    The human intelligence collector is responsible for information collection operations. They provide Army personnel with information about the enemy force’s strengths, weaknesses and potential battle areas.

  • Signals Intelligence Analyst (35N)

    A signals intelligence analyst examines foreign communications/activity and relays that information by producing combat, strategic and tactical intelligence reports.

  • Cryptologic Linguist (35P)

    A cryptologic linguist is primarily responsible for identifying foreign communications using signals equipment. Their role is crucial as the nation’s defense depends largely on information that comes from foreign languages.

  • Soldiers in a Cyber room.

    Cryptologic Cyberspace Intelligence Collector/Analyst (35Q)

    A Cryptologic Cyberspace Intelligence Collector/Analyst performs initial cryptologic digital analysis to establish target identification and operational patterns; identifies, reports, and maintains Intelligence information in support of Commander'€™s Intelligence Requirements and uses technical references to analyze information.

  • Soldiers in a Cyber room.

    Signals Collection Analyst (35S)

    The signals collector/analyst is primarily responsible for the detection, acquisition, location and identification of foreign electronic intelligence. They exploit non-voice communications and other electronic signals to provide strategic/tactical intelligence.

  • Military Intelligence (MI) Systems Maintainer/Integrator (35T)

    The military intelligence systems maintainer/integrator is primarily responsible for maintaining intelligence computers and networks used by Military Intelligence Soldiers.

  • Soldiers in a Cyber room.

    Human Intelligence Collector Recruit (35W)

    The Human Intelligence Collector is responsible for information collection operations. They provide Army personnel with information about the enemy force’s strengths, weaknesses and potential battle areas.

  • Soldier working on a computer.

    Financial Management Technician (36B)

    The finance management technician is responsible for financial management duties such as budgeting, disbursing and accounting for government funds. They make sure vendors are paid, budgets are balanced and financial matters are met so the Army keeps running.

  • Officer and Soldiers

    Psychological Operations Specialist (37F)

    Psychological Operations Specialists are influence experts, who assesses the information needs of a target population and craft messaging to influence and engage target audiences.

  • Civil Affairs Specialist speaking to villagers

    Civil Affairs Specialist (38B)

    Civil Affairs Specialists identify critical requirements needed by local citizens in combat or crisis situations. Civil Affairs Specialists are primarily responsible for researching, coordinating, conducting and participating in the planning and production of civil affairs related documents, while enabling the civil-military operations of the supported commander.

  • Soldier working on a computer.

    Human Resources Specialist (42A)

    A human resources specialist is responsible for providing support that affects Soldiers’ overall welfare and well-being while assisting leaders with keeping Soldiers combat-ready and effective.

  • Soldier capturing a photo.

    Public Affairs Mass Communication Specialist (46S)

    The Army Public Affairs Mass Communication Specialist participates in and assists with the supervision and administration of Army public affairs programs primarily through news releases, newspaper articles, Web-based material and photographs for use in military and civilian news media.

  • Religious Affairs Specialists serve as assistants to Army Chaplains.

    Religious Affairs Specialist (56M)

    Religious Affairs Specialists provide much-needed support to the chaplains during missions and everyday activities. A Religious Affairs Specialist’s primary purpose is support for the unit ministry team programs and worship services.

  • Biomedical Equipment Specialist (68A)

    The biomedical equipment specialist is primarily responsible for servicing and maintaining all medical equipment.

  • Operating Room Specialist

    Orthopedic Specialist (68B)

    The orthopedic specialist assists with management of orthopedic clinic, or assists in treatment of patients with orthopedic conditions and injuries, under the supervision of an orthopedic physician, orthopedic physician assistant, or podiatrist.

  • Practical Nursing Specialist (68C)

    The practical nursing specialist supervises or performs preventive, therapeutic, and emergency nursing care procedures under the supervision of a physician, nurse or NCO.

  • Operating Room Specialist (68D)

    The operating room specialist assists the nursing staff in preparing the patient and the operating room environment for surgery and for providing assistance to the medical staff during surgical procedures.

    They also operate the centralized material service and are responsible for preparing and maintaining sterile medical supplies and special equipment for medical treatment facilities.

  • Soldier prepping dental equipment.

    Dental Specialist (68E)

    The dental specialist is primarily responsible for assisting Army dentists in the examination and treatment of patients, as well as helping to manage dental offices.

  • Physical Therapy Specialist

    Physical Therapy Specialist (68F)

    The physical therapy specialist, under the direction of a physical therapist and following medical referral, supervises or administers physical therapy to decrease physical disabilities and promotes physical fitness of patients.

  • Soldier filling out paperwork.

    Patient Administration Specialist (68G)

    The patient administration specialist is primarily responsible for supervising and performing administrative duties in the patient administration division of an Army hospital or other medical facilities.

  • Soldier repairing eye glasses.

    Optical Laboratory Specialist (68H)

    The optical laboratory specialist is primarily responsible for making and repairing eyeglasses that are provided for Army personnel.

  • Soldiers assemble medical supplies for aid stations.

    Medical Logistics Specialist (68J)

    The medical logistics specialist is primarily responsible for receiving, storing, recording and issuing Army medical supplies.

  • Medical Laboratory Specialist (68K)

    The medical laboratory specialist conducts tests on the tissue, blood and body fluids of patients.

  • Soldier works with a patient performing hand movements and exercises.

    Occupational Therapy Specialist (68L)

    The occupational therapy specialist, under the direction of a registered military occupational therapist, supervises, tests and assists patients to facilitate maximum recovery. They also treat physical and mental disabilities resulting from illness or trauma, prevent injury, and promote life-style modification to improve fitness. 

  • Soldier giving a nutrition brief.

    Nutrition Care Specialist (68M)

    The Nutrition Care Specialist works with Registered Dietitians (RD) counseling patients individually and in group settings, plans special diets for patients according to nutritional requirements, and creates menus and prepares small quantity foods.

  • Soldier treating a patient.

    Cardiovascular Specialist (68N)

    The cardiovascular specialist assists with the management of cardiac clinics and performs specialized, invasive and noninvasive cardiac tests and examinations.

  • Radiology Specialist (68P)

    The radiology specialist is primarily responsible for operating X-ray and related equipment used in diagnosing and treating injuries and diseases.

  • Soldier filling prescription bottle.

    Pharmacy Specialist (68Q)

    The pharmacy specialist is primarily responsible for preparing and dispensing prescribed drugs and medicines, while also maintaining pharmacy supplies and records.

  • Soldier conducting inventory of a field freezer.

    Veterinary Food Inspection Specialist (68R)

    The veterinary food inspection specialist inspects food designed for human consumption, while also supervising food inspection and combined veterinary service activities.

  • Soldier filling a prescription bottle.

    Preventive Medicine Specialist (68S)

    Preventive medicine specialists are primarily responsible for conducting or assisting with preventive medicine inspections, surveys and preventative medicine laboratory procedures. They also supervise preventive medicine facilities or serve on preventive medicine staffs.

  • Animal Care Specialist (68T)

    The animal care specialist is primarily responsible for the prevention and control of diseases transmitted from animal to man, as well as the comprehensive care for government-owned animals.

  • Soldier shows a technique to check the ear drums of a patient while conducting a physical after a hearing test.

    Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Specialist (68U)

    The ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist supervises or conducts routine diagnostic tests and assists in the care and treatment of ENT and audiology patients. ENT specialists work alongside otolaryngologist assisting in care of patients with ear, nose and throat issues and recovery.  

  • Soldier treating a patient.

    Respiratory Specialist (68V)

    The respiratory specialist is primarily responsible for helping with the management of a respiratory unit by administering respiratory therapy and performing pulmonary function tests under the supervision of a physician or nurse anesthetist.

    The respiratory specialist is strictly an advanced level position. 

  • Health Care Specialist

    Combat Medic Specialist (68W)

    The combat medic specialist is primarily responsible for providing emergency medical treatment at point of wounding on the battlefield, limited primary care, and health protection and evacuation from a point of injury or illness.

  • Behavioral Health Specialist (68X)

    The Behavioral Health Specialist is primarily responsible for assisting with the management and treatment of inpatient and outpatient mental health activities.

  • Soldier examining a patients eyes.

    Eye Specialist (68Y)

    The eye specialist supervises or conducts routine diagnostic tests and assists in the care and treatment of ophthalmology or optometry patients. Eye specialists work closely with ophthalmologists, optometrists and ophthalmic specialists in caring for patients with eye problems.

  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Specialist (74D)

    Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Specialists are primarily responsible for defending the country against the threat of CBRN weapons and Weapons of Mass Destruction.

  • Soldier loading a trailer with turrets.

    Cargo Specialist (88H)

    Cargo specialists help ensure Army forces receive supplies, weapons, equipment and mail — on a daily basis, all over the world. They are primarily responsible for transferring or supervising the transfer of passengers, cargo and equipment to and from air, land and water transport by manual and mechanical methods.

  • Soldier prepares a fuel supply line aboard the U.S. Army Landing Craft Utility 2031.

    Watercraft Operator (88K)

    Watercraft operators are primarily responsible for navigation, cargo operations and supervising other Soldiers on Army watercraft. They are part of a piloting team using electronic positioning systems, handheld navigation tools and traditional watch standing procedures aboard many of the Army’s watercraft.

  • Soldier working on a pump.

    Watercraft Engineer (88L)

    Watercraft engineers are primarily responsible for supervising or performing maintenance on Army watercraft and auxiliary equipment on marine vessels.

  • Motor Transport Operator

    Motor Transport Operator (88M)

    Motor transport operators are primarily responsible for supervising or operating wheel vehicles to transport personnel and cargo. They are the backbone of the Army’s support and sustainment structure, providing advanced mobility on and off the battlefield.

  • Transportation Management Coordinator

    Transportation Management Coordinator (88N)

    Transportation management coordinators are primarily responsible for scheduling and selecting the modes of transportation for personnel and equipment. They organize, plan and oversee the movement of those vehicles, personnel and cargo worldwide.

  •  Soldier conducting railway loading operations.

    Railway Operations Crewmember (88U)

    Railway operations crewmembers are primarily responsible for supervising and operating diesel-electric locomotives and related equipment. They also serve as a crewmember or brakeman in the makeup and movement of railway cars and trains.

  • Soldier receives ammunition.

    Ammunition Stock Control and Accounting Specialist (89A)

    The ammunition stock control and accounting specialist operates the Standard Ammunition and Accounting System-Modernized computer hardware and software, and utilizes manual records to perform stock control and accounting procedures for ammunition, explosives and associated explosive components.

  • Soldier inserting bullets in a magazine.

    Ammunition Specialist (89B)

    Ammunition specialists are specialized Soldiers who are responsible for the management of ordnance (ammunition and explosives). They are tasked with receiving, storing and issuing conventional ammunition, guided missiles, large rockets, explosives and other ammunition and explosive related items.

  • Soldier with EOD robot.

    Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Specialist (89D)

    Explosive ordnance disposal specialist Soldiers are the Army's preeminent tactical and technical explosives experts. They are warriors who are properly trained, equipped and integrated to attack, defeat and exploit unexploded ordnance, improvised explosive devices and weapons of mass destruction.

    Explosive ordnance disposal specialists are the culmination of the best tactical and technical training the Army and civilian academia can provide. They are prepared to perform missions in support of Army units worldwide, across all operational environments.

  • Ordnance Officer talking to an enlisted Soldier.

    Ordnance Officer (91A)

    Ordnance officers are responsible for ensuring that weapons systems, vehicles and equipment are ready and available — and in perfect working order — at all times. They also manage the developing, testing, fielding, handling, storage and disposal of munitions.

  • Wheeled Vehicle Mechanic (91B)

    The wheeled vehicle mechanic is primarily responsible for supervising and performing maintenance and recovery operations on wheeled vehicles and associated items, as well as heavy-wheeled vehicles and select armored vehicles.

  • Soldier stands ready to answer questions about vehicles and dispatches.

    Utilities Equipment Repairer (91C)

    The utilities equipment repairer is responsible for supervising and performing maintenance on utilities equipment and special purpose support systems.

  • Soldiers sustaining a Deployable Rapid Assembly Shelter generator.

    Tactical Power Generation Specialist (91D)

    The tactical power generation specialist is responsible for supervising and performing maintenance and overhaul of power-generation equipment, internal combustion engines and associated equipment in mobile and stationary power plants.

  • Soldier welds a tool designed to help replace a large fan assembly in a M88 track vehicle.

    Allied Trade Specialist (91E)

    The allied trade specialist is primarily responsible for supervising and performing the fabrication, repair and modification of metallic and nonmetallic parts. They operate lathes, drill presses, grinders and other machine shop equipment.

  • Small Arms/Artillery Repairer (91F)

    The small arms/artillery repairer is responsible for keeping a wide array of weapons — from small arms to field artillery and large ballistic missiles — operating properly.

  • Track Vehicle Repairer (91H)

    The track vehicle repairer is primarily responsible for performing maintenance on tracked vehicles and supervising activities that include fuel and electrical system repair and maintenance.

  • Soldier closing a Fuel System Supply Point valve.

    Quartermaster and Chemical Equipment Repairer (91J)

    The quartermaster and chemical equipment repairer are primarily responsible for supervising or performing maintenance on chemical equipment, quartermaster machinery, forced air-heaters and special purpose equipment.

  • Soldiers working on equipment.

    Construction Equipment Repairer (91L)

    Construction equipment repairers are responsible for maintaining trucks, bulldozers, power shovels and other heavy equipment that are needed for construction operations.

  • Bradley Fighting Vehicle System Maintainer (91M)

    The Bradley fighting vehicle system maintainer handles the maintenance and repair of the M2/M3, A2/A3 Bradley fighting vehicle, the M6 Bradley linebacker air defense vehicle and the M-7 Bradley fire support team vehicle.

  • Soldier preparing a M119A3 Howitzer.

    Artillery Mechanic (91P)

    The artillery mechanic is primarily responsible for supervising and performing maintenance and recovery operations of all self-propelled field artillery cannon weapon systems — including automotive, turret, fire control and chemical protection subsystems.

  • Stryker Systems Maintainer (91S)

    The Stryker systems maintainer works as part of a team to maintain the Stryker family of vehicles and keep the vehicles and the operating systems running smoothly. 

    Some of those vehicles include the M1128 Mobile gun system, the M1132 Engineer support vehicle, the M1133 Medical evacuation vehicle and the M1135 NBC recon vehicle.

  • Soldiers discussing a training event.

    Quartermaster Officer (92A)

    Quartermaster officers are responsible for making sure equipment, materials and systems are available and functioning for missions. More specifically, the quartermaster officer provides supply support for Soldiers and units in field services, aerial delivery, and material and distribution management.

  • Petroleum Supply Specialist (92F)

    Petroleum supply specialists are primarily responsible for supervising and managing the reception, storage and shipping of bulk or packaged petroleum-based products.

  • Culinary Specialist (92G)

    The culinary specialist is primarily responsible for the preparation and service of food in field or garrison food service operations.

  • Soldier explaining the standard operating procedures he has to execute when units submit fuel sample to the PQAS-E at the Joint National Training Center.

    Petroleum Laboratory Specialist (92L)

    Petroleum laboratory specialists are primarily responsible for supervising or conducting laboratory tests on petroleum, oil and lubricant products.

  • U.S. Army Soldier irons a United States flag

    Mortuary Affairs Specialist (92M)

    The mortuary affairs specialist performs duties relating to deceased personnel, including recovery, collection, evacuation and establishment of tentative identification. They also inventory, safeguard and evacuate personal effects of deceased personnel and serve as recovery specialists at the U.S. Army’s Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii.

  • Parachute Rigger (92R)

    Parachute riggers are primarily responsible for repairing textile and canvas items, webbed equipment and clothing.

  • Soldier guiding an All Terrain Lifter, Army System (ATLAS) that is picking up laundry bags for a Laundry Advanced System (LADS).

    Shower/Laundry and Clothing Repair Specialist (92S)

    Shower/laundry and clothing repair specialists are primarily responsible for supervising and performing laundry, shower, personnel and clothing decontamination functions.

  • Soldiers filling containers with purified water.

    Water Treatment Specialist (92W)

    Water treatment specialists are primarily responsible for supervising or performing the installation and operation of water purification equipment, as well as dealing with water storage and distribution operations and activities. They also inspect facilities and food supplies for the presence of disease, germs or other conditions hazardous to health and the environment.

  • Soldier inspecting equipment.

    Unit Supply Specialist (92Y)

    The unit supply specialist is primarily responsible for supervising or performing tasks involving the general upkeep and maintenance of all Army supplies and equipment.

  • Soldiers assembling the Milan 2 Antitank System.

    Land Combat Electronic Missile System Repairer (94A)

    The land combat electronic missile system repairer supervises or performs field and sustainment level maintenance on a variety of systems, including the M-220 antitank missile system, Javelin systems and the Bradley fighting vehicle TOW subsystem.

  • Soldier preparing to load high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles, known as Humvees.

    Air Traffic Control Equipment Repairer (94D)

    The air traffic control equipment repairer performs or supervises field and sustainment level maintenance and installation of air traffic control communications, navigation aids and landing systems.

  • Soldier directing base defense live fire training.

    Radio and Communications Security Repairer (94E)

    The radio/communications security repairer performs or supervises field and sustainment level maintenance on radio receivers, transmitters, communication security equipment, controlled cryptographic items and other associated equipment.

  • Computer/Detection Systems Repairer

    Computer/Detection Systems Repairer (94F)

    The computer/detection systems repairer performs maintenance and repair on a variety of critical systems and equipment, including microcomputers and electromechanical telecommunications equipment, field artillery digital devices, Global Positioning System receivers, night vision devices/equipment and laser and fiber optic systems.

  • Soldier using the optics on the Lightweight Laser Designator Range Finder.

    Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment Maintenance Support Specialist (94H)

    Distance, pressure, altitude, underwater depth — they’re all measured by precision instruments. The test measurement and diagnostic equipment support specialist keeps all the Army’s precision instruments in top condition.

  • RADAR Repairer (94M)

    The radar repairer is an essential member of the Army communications maintenance team and performs maintenance on ground surveillance radar and associated equipment.

  • Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) Repairer (94P)

    As an essential member of the Army’s weapons maintenance team, the multiple launch rocket system repairer supervises and performs maintenance on various rocket systems, including the Multiple Launch Rocket System, High Mobility Artillery Rocket System and the self-propelled launcher-loader.

  • Avionic and Survivability Equipment Repairer

    Avionic and Survivability Equipment Repairer (94R)

    An avionic and survivability equipment repairer is an essential member of the Army communications maintenance team and is primarily responsible for performing field and sustainment level maintenance on avionic navigation flight control systems, stabilization systems and equipment.

  • PATRIOT System Repairer (94S)

    As an essential member of the Army’s weapons maintenance team, the PATRIOT system repairer is primarily responsible for performing field level maintenance on the PATRIOT system, a combat missile system that features a phased array radar set and control station.

  • Short Range Air Defense System Repairer (94T)

    As an essential member of the Army’s weapons maintenance team, the short range air defense system repairer is primarily responsible for performing and supervising maintenance on the AVENGER system, a lightweight, highly mobile and transportable surface-to-air missile/gun weapon system that provides short-range air defense protection against air and land attacks.

  • Automatic Test Systems Operator and Maintainer (94Y)

    The Automatic Test Systems Operator and Maintainer is primarily responsible for maintaining the base shop test facility, performing electronic maintenance on shop replaceable units, system supported line replaceable units and test program sets.

Insert your line scores above to see what jobs you could be qualified for.

OTHER RESOURCES TO PREPARE FOR THE ASVAB TEST

Check out other Department of Defense websites for more information about the ASVAB and AFQT tests and practice questions.

March 2 Success

March 2 Success provides materials to help improve scores on the standardized tests, such as SAT, ACT, state exit exams and ASVAB.

ASVAB CAREER EXPLORATION PROGRAM

The ASVAB Career Exploration Program was developed with input from a panel of career-development experts and designed to encourage students to increase their level of self-knowledge and to understand how that information could be linked to civilian and military occupational characteristics.

Today's Military

Today's military website provides a section dedicated to exploring military tests, specifically the ASVAB, and helping potential military candidates learn more about their skills and interests, helping match them up with possible career paths.

ARMY CAREER EXPLORER

Take a look at the jobs and career paths that fit your goals by creating an account and exploring your options. Part of the Army career explorer is a practice ASVAB test that will give you a general idea of your strengths and weaknesses, and average ASVAB score.