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Army prospect happy with her ASVAB test scores

Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT DOES THE ASVAB MEASURE?

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery measures your knowledge and ability in ten different areas. It is not an IQ test, but the ASVAB does help the Army assess which jobs you are best suited to perform.

HOW CAN I PRACTICE FOR THE ASVAB?

You don’t have to go through any special preparation to take the ASVAB. Getting a good night’s rest and arriving on time are the two most important steps you can take to prepare.

WHO GIVES THE ASVAB, AND WHERE CAN I TAKE IT?

The ASVAB is usually given in schools by test administrators from the federal government. Schools determine where and when the ASVAB will be given. See your academic advisor for more information. If you’re not currently in school, contact your local recruiter for more information on ASVAB requirements and testing locations. You may now also take an unproctored version of the ASVAB test, called the PiCAT, at home at your own convenience.

WHAT IS THE PiCAT?

The Pending Internet Computerized Adaptive Test (PiCAT) is an alternative to current ASVAB testing procedures. It is an unproctored, full version of the ASVAB you may take on your own time. In order to take this test, you will need to contact a local recruiter in order to register and receive an access code. After completing the test, you may contact your recruiter in order to find out your score. If you choose to enlist, your PiCAT score will be validated at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) with a proctored verification test that will take 25-30 minutes.

WHAT CAN I EXPECT ON THE DAY OF THE TEST?

The ASVAB consists of ten short tests to complete during three hours or less. An ASVAB test administrator will give you instructions and tell you how long you have to complete each test. However, before you begin, you will have a chance to answer some practice questions and ask any questions about taking the test.

WHAT KIND OF QUESTIONS WILL I BE ASKED ON THE ASVAB?

The ASVAB tests cover general science, arithmetic reasoning, word knowledge, paragraph comprehension, numerical operations, coding speed, auto and shop information, mathematics knowledge, mechanical comprehension and electronics information.

WHAT SCORE DO I NEED TO PASS THE ASVAB? WHAT DO MY SCORES MEAN, AND HOW ARE THEY USED?

While there is no "failing" the ASVAB, you will need to score at least a 31 on the exam to be considered for enlistment in the Army. Your scores will be provided to you on a report called the ASVAB Student Results Sheet, with additional information to help you understand your score.

Understanding the asvab test areas

The ASVAB is a series of tests developed by the Department of Defense and is used by the U.S. Army to determine whether you have the mental aptitude to enlist. The ASVAB also helps determine which Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) you qualify for. The ASVAB is required to enlist in the U.S. Army and is valid for two years. The ASVAB may be given in a computerized version at a Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) or in a paper version at various Military Entrance Test (MET) sites around the country or at high schools and colleges. 

ASVAB Test Areas

  • General Science - measures knowledge of life science, earth and space science, and physical science
  • Arithmetic Reasoning - measures ability to solve basic arithmetic word problems
  • Word Knowledge - measures ability to understand the meaning of words through synonyms
  • Paragraph Comprehension - measures ability to obtain information from written material
  • Mathematics Knowledge - measures knowledge of mathematical concepts and applications
  • Electronics Information - measures knowledge of electrical current, circuits, devices and electronic systems
  • Auto and Shop Information - measures knowledge of automotive maintenance and repair, and wood and metal shop practices
  • Mechanical Comprehension - measures knowledge of the principles of mechanical devices, structural support and properties of materials
  • Assembling Objects - measures ability with spatial relationships
 

 

ASVAB Scores and AFQT scores

The AFQT score is the most important ASVAB score, because it determines if you can enlist in the U.S. Army. However, the U.S. Army also converts the ASVAB test scores into 10 other composite score areas known as "line scores" that determine what MOS an individual may qualify for. Listed below are the parts of the ASVAB that affect your AFQT test scores and each of the ten line scores.

  • Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT) - Paragraph Comprehension, Word Knowledge, Mathematics Knowledge, and Arithmetic Reasoning.
  • Clerical (CL) – Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning and Mathematics Knowledge.
  • Combat (CO) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • Electronics (EL) – General Science, Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge and Electronic Information.
  • Field Artillery (FA) - Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • General Maintenance (GM) – General Science, Auto & Shop, Mathematics Knowledge and Electronics Information.
  • General Technical (GT) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension and Arithmetic Reasoning (AR).
  • Mechanical Maintenance (MM) – Auto & Shop, Mechanical Comprehension and Electronic Information.
  • Operators and Food (OF) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • Surveillance and Communications (SC) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Arithmetic Reasoning, Auto & Shop and Mechanical Comprehension.
  • Skilled Technical (ST) - Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, General Science, Mechanical Comprehension and Mathematics Knowledge.
 
 

  • Soldiers assess an area.

    Power Distribution Specialist (12Q)

    The  power distribution specialist is primarily responsible for the electrical distribution system in the Army.

  • Interior Electrician (12R)

    The interior electrician is primarily responsible for the installation and maintenance for all of the Army’s interior electrical systems.

  • PATRIOT Fire Control Enhanced Operator/Maintainer (14E)

    A Patriot Fire Control Enhanced Operator/Maintainer operates and maintains one of the world’s most advanced missile systems – Patriot; the center piece weapon system of the Army’s air defense mission against multiple air threats to include ballistic missile, cruise missiles, and aircraft of all types. The 14E is responsible for operating and maintaining the five major parts of the Patriot Fire Control system: Radar Set, Engagement Control Station, Electronic Power Plant, Antenna Mast Group, and Battle Command Post. The 14E Soldier is also responsible for identifying, tracking, and combating those identified threats using a technology advanced interceptor missile that is capable of destroying enemy air threats at a moment’s notice.

  • Air Defense Battle Management System Operator (14G)

    The Air Defense Battle Management System Operator maintains, manages and operates modern complicated military computers on complex networks, communications equipment systems, and the Sentinel Radar in order to provide warning, detection, and protection for armed forces from aerial attack, missile attack, and aerial surveillance. Soldiers are responsible for integrating all air defense detection assets and firing units, maintaining tactical computer data links/networks that provide situational awareness, communication of detected threats throughout the air defense network, and serves as an air defense liaison to other services in all combat environments involving air defense.

  • Air Defense Enhanced Early Warning System Operator (14H)

    The Air Defense Enhanced Early Warning Systems Operator evaluates and communicates critical data about incoming enemy aerial and missile attacks and aerial surveillance by operating, maintaining and managing modern complicated military computers on complex networks, and utilizing sophisticated communications equipment. These Soldiers are responsible for the preparation and deployment of air defense equipment and systems, setup of a unit command post, establishing communication and network interoperability and integrating with Allied, Joint service and other Air Defense units.

    The 14H Soldier maintains computer data links and networks that provide early detection and tracking of possible air threats from the earth’s surface to space, providing the units with situational awareness and current air threat data which enable their engagement and destruction by Air Defense units.  They also serve as an air defense liaison to other services in all combat environments involving air defense.

  • Soldier repairing a Apache helicopter inside a hangar.

    Avionic Mechanic (15N)

    The avionic mechanic performs maintenance on tactical-communications-security, communication, navigation and flight control equipment.

  • Soldier working on an AH-64 Apache helicopter.

    AH-64 Attack Helicopter Repairer (15R)

    The AH-64 attack helicopter repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of the AH-64 attack helicopters (also known as the “Apache”). With hundreds of Army missions depending on these helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Kiowa Warrior Helicopters

    OH-58D Helicopter Repairer (15S)

    The OH-58D Helicopter Repairer is primarily responsible for the maintenance of the OH-58D helicopters (also known as the “Kiowa Warrior”). With hundreds of Army missions depending on these helicopters, they must ensure that all of them are safe and ready to fly.

  • Soldiers setting up a microwave communication system.

    Microwave Systems Operator-Maintainer (25P)

    Microwave systems installer-maintainers are primarily responsible for installing, operating and maintaining microwave communications systems. They also work with associated antennas, multiplexing and communications security equipment.

  • Soldier preparing to capture images of a training event.

    Visual Information Equipment Operator-Maintainer (25R)

    A visual information equipment operator-maintainer is responsible for installing, operating, maintaining and performing unit and higher levels of maintenance on visual information equipment and systems. 

  • U.S. Army Paralegal Specialist

    Paralegal Specialist (27D)

    The paralegal specialist is not like being a legal assistant, they are expected to provide legal/administrative support in all areas of criminal law, international law, civil/administrative law, contract law and fiscal law. They assist judges, Judge Advocates and unit commanders with a wide range of legal matters and judicial work.

  • Soldier working on a computer.

    Financial Management Technician (36B)

    The finance management technician is responsible for financial management duties such as budgeting, disbursing and accounting for government funds. They make sure vendors are paid, budgets are balanced and financial matters are met so the Army keeps running.

  • Officer and Soldiers

    Psychological Operations Specialist (37F)

    Psychological Operations Specialists are influence experts, who assesses the information needs of a target population and craft messaging to influence and engage target audiences.

  • Civil Affairs Specialist speaking to villagers

    Civil Affairs Specialist (38B)

    Civil Affairs Specialists identify critical requirements needed by local citizens in combat or crisis situations. Civil Affairs Specialists are primarily responsible for researching, coordinating, conducting and participating in the planning and production of civil affairs related documents, while enabling the civil-military operations of the supported commander.

  • Soldier working on a computer.

    Human Resources Specialist (42A)

    A human resources specialist is responsible for providing support that affects Soldiers’ overall welfare and well-being while assisting leaders with keeping Soldiers combat-ready and effective.

  • Soldier capturing a photo.

    Public Affairs Mass Communication Specialist (46S)

    The Army Public Affairs Mass Communication Specialist participates in and assists with the supervision and administration of Army public affairs programs primarily through news releases, newspaper articles, Web-based material and photographs for use in military and civilian news media.

  • Religious Affairs Specialists serve as assistants to Army Chaplains.

    Religious Affairs Specialist (56M)

    Religious Affairs Specialists provide much-needed support to the chaplains during missions and everyday activities. A Religious Affairs Specialist’s primary purpose is support for the unit ministry team programs and worship services.

  • Biomedical Equipment Specialist (68A)

    The biomedical equipment specialist is primarily responsible for servicing and maintaining all medical equipment.

  • Soldier filling out paperwork.

    Patient Administration Specialist (68G)

    The patient administration specialist is primarily responsible for supervising and performing administrative duties in the patient administration division of an Army hospital or other medical facilities.

  • Soldiers assemble medical supplies for aid stations.

    Medical Logistics Specialist (68J)

    The medical logistics specialist is primarily responsible for receiving, storing, recording and issuing Army medical supplies.

  • Soldier prepares a fuel supply line aboard the U.S. Army Landing Craft Utility 2031.

    Watercraft Operator (88K)

    Watercraft operators are primarily responsible for navigation, cargo operations and supervising other Soldiers on Army watercraft. They are part of a piloting team using electronic positioning systems, handheld navigation tools and traditional watch standing procedures aboard many of the Army’s watercraft.

  • Soldier working on a pump.

    Watercraft Engineer (88L)

    Watercraft engineers are primarily responsible for supervising or performing maintenance on Army watercraft and auxiliary equipment on marine vessels.

  • Transportation Management Coordinator

    Transportation Management Coordinator (88N)

    Transportation management coordinators are primarily responsible for scheduling and selecting the modes of transportation for personnel and equipment. They organize, plan and oversee the movement of those vehicles, personnel and cargo worldwide.

  •  Soldier conducting railway loading operations.

    Railway Operations Crewmember (88U)

    Railway operations crewmembers are primarily responsible for supervising and operating diesel-electric locomotives and related equipment. They also serve as a crewmember or brakeman in the makeup and movement of railway cars and trains.

  • Ordnance Officer talking to an enlisted Soldier.

    Ordnance Officer (91A)

    Ordnance officers are responsible for ensuring that weapons systems, vehicles and equipment are ready and available — and in perfect working order — at all times. They also manage the developing, testing, fielding, handling, storage and disposal of munitions.

  • Wheeled Vehicle Mechanic (91B)

    The wheeled vehicle mechanic is primarily responsible for supervising and performing maintenance and recovery operations on wheeled vehicles and associated items, as well as heavy-wheeled vehicles and select armored vehicles.

  • Track Vehicle Repairer (91H)

    The track vehicle repairer is primarily responsible for performing maintenance on tracked vehicles and supervising activities that include fuel and electrical system repair and maintenance.

  • Soldier closing a Fuel System Supply Point valve.

    Quartermaster and Chemical Equipment Repairer (91J)

    The quartermaster and chemical equipment repairer are primarily responsible for supervising or performing maintenance on chemical equipment, quartermaster machinery, forced air-heaters and special purpose equipment.

  • Soldiers working on equipment.

    Construction Equipment Repairer (91L)

    Construction equipment repairers are responsible for maintaining trucks, bulldozers, power shovels and other heavy equipment that are needed for construction operations.

  • Bradley Fighting Vehicle System Maintainer (91M)

    The Bradley fighting vehicle system maintainer handles the maintenance and repair of the M2/M3, A2/A3 Bradley fighting vehicle, the M6 Bradley linebacker air defense vehicle and the M-7 Bradley fire support team vehicle.

  • Soldier preparing a M119A3 Howitzer.

    Artillery Mechanic (91P)

    The artillery mechanic is primarily responsible for supervising and performing maintenance and recovery operations of all self-propelled field artillery cannon weapon systems — including automotive, turret, fire control and chemical protection subsystems.

  • Stryker Systems Maintainer (91S)

    The Stryker systems maintainer works as part of a team to maintain the Stryker family of vehicles and keep the vehicles and the operating systems running smoothly. 

    Some of those vehicles include the M1128 Mobile gun system, the M1132 Engineer support vehicle, the M1133 Medical evacuation vehicle and the M1135 NBC recon vehicle.

  • Soldiers discussing a training event.

    Quartermaster Officer (92A)

    Quartermaster officers are responsible for making sure equipment, materials and systems are available and functioning for missions. More specifically, the quartermaster officer provides supply support for Soldiers and units in field services, aerial delivery, and material and distribution management.

  • Soldier inspecting equipment.

    Unit Supply Specialist (92Y)

    The unit supply specialist is primarily responsible for supervising or performing tasks involving the general upkeep and maintenance of all Army supplies and equipment.

  • Soldiers assembling the Milan 2 Antitank System.

    Land Combat Electronic Missile System Repairer (94A)

    The land combat electronic missile system repairer supervises or performs field and sustainment level maintenance on a variety of systems, including the M-220 antitank missile system, Javelin systems and the Bradley fighting vehicle TOW subsystem.

  • Soldier preparing to load high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles, known as Humvees.

    Air Traffic Control Equipment Repairer (94D)

    The air traffic control equipment repairer performs or supervises field and sustainment level maintenance and installation of air traffic control communications, navigation aids and landing systems.

  • Soldier directing base defense live fire training.

    Radio and Communications Security Repairer (94E)

    The radio/communications security repairer performs or supervises field and sustainment level maintenance on radio receivers, transmitters, communication security equipment, controlled cryptographic items and other associated equipment.

  • Computer/Detection Systems Repairer

    Computer/Detection Systems Repairer (94F)

    The computer/detection systems repairer performs maintenance and repair on a variety of critical systems and equipment, including microcomputers and electromechanical telecommunications equipment, field artillery digital devices, Global Positioning System receivers, night vision devices/equipment and laser and fiber optic systems.

  • Soldier using the optics on the Lightweight Laser Designator Range Finder.

    Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment Maintenance Support Specialist (94H)

    Distance, pressure, altitude, underwater depth — they’re all measured by precision instruments. The test measurement and diagnostic equipment support specialist keeps all the Army’s precision instruments in top condition.

  • RADAR Repairer (94M)

    The radar repairer is an essential member of the Army communications maintenance team and performs maintenance on ground surveillance radar and associated equipment.

  • Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) Repairer (94P)

    As an essential member of the Army’s weapons maintenance team, the multiple launch rocket system repairer supervises and performs maintenance on various rocket systems, including the Multiple Launch Rocket System, High Mobility Artillery Rocket System and the self-propelled launcher-loader.

  • Avionic and Survivability Equipment Repairer

    Avionic and Survivability Equipment Repairer (94R)

    An avionic and survivability equipment repairer is an essential member of the Army communications maintenance team and is primarily responsible for performing field and sustainment level maintenance on avionic navigation flight control systems, stabilization systems and equipment.

  • PATRIOT System Repairer (94S)

    As an essential member of the Army’s weapons maintenance team, the PATRIOT system repairer is primarily responsible for performing field level maintenance on the PATRIOT system, a combat missile system that features a phased array radar set and control station.

  • Short Range Air Defense System Repairer (94T)

    As an essential member of the Army’s weapons maintenance team, the short range air defense system repairer is primarily responsible for performing and supervising maintenance on the AVENGER system, a lightweight, highly mobile and transportable surface-to-air missile/gun weapon system that provides short-range air defense protection against air and land attacks.

  • Automatic Test Systems Operator and Maintainer (94Y)

    The Automatic Test Systems Operator and Maintainer is primarily responsible for maintaining the base shop test facility, performing electronic maintenance on shop replaceable units, system supported line replaceable units and test program sets.

Insert your line scores above to see what jobs you could be qualified for.

OTHER RESOURCES TO PREPARE FOR THE ASVAB TEST

Check out other Department of Defense websites for more information about the ASVAB and AFQT tests and practice questions.

March 2 Success

March 2 Success provides materials to help improve scores on the standardized tests, such as SAT, ACT, state exit exams and ASVAB.

ASVAB CAREER EXPLORATION PROGRAM

The ASVAB Career Exploration Program was developed with input from a panel of career-development experts and designed to encourage students to increase their level of self-knowledge and to understand how that information could be linked to civilian and military occupational characteristics.

Today's Military

Today's military website provides a section dedicated to exploring military tests, specifically the ASVAB, and helping potential military candidates learn more about their skills and interests, helping match them up with possible career paths.

ARMY CAREER EXPLORER

Take a look at the jobs and career paths that fit your goals by creating an account and exploring your options. Part of the Army career explorer is a practice ASVAB test that will give you a general idea of your strengths and weaknesses, and average ASVAB score.