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11B – Airborne Infantry:

Learn parachuting protocol and orienteering, utilizing the most cutting edge equipment and techniques.

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11B – Airborne Infantry:

Learn parachuting protocol and orienteering, utilizing the most cutting edge equipment and techniques.

Hello my name is Staff Sergeant Zachary King and I’m an Airborne Infantryman with the 82nd Airborne Division. My job in the 82nd airborne division is to find, engage, and destroy the enemy.
The first thing we’ll discuss is the five points of performance. The first point of performance being proper exit, check body position, and count. Keeping your eyes open, chin on chest, elbows tight to your sides, fingers spread over the ends of your reserve parachute, feet and knees together, knees locked the rear, you’re going to count to four thousand. And the end of your four thousand count, if you do not feel the opening shock of your main parachute, you will immediately activate your reserve parachute.
Which takes us to our second point of performance, which is: check canopy and gain canopy control. When jumping the T-10 Delta main parachute, you will secure all four sets of risers, and simultaneously conduct a three-hundred and sixty degree check of your canopy.
Which takes us to our third point of performance, which is: keep a sharp lookout for fellow jumpers during your entire descent. Remember the three rules of the air which are: always look before you turn, always turn right to avoid collisions, and lower jumper has the right of way. At the end of your third point of performance, release all appropriate equipment tie downs.
Which takes us to our fourth point of performance, which is: slip, turn to the wind, and prepare to land. At approximately two-hundred feet above ground level, you look below you to ensure there are no fellow jumpers below you, you will slip turn to the wind at approximately one-hundred feet above ground level. If the wind is blowing from your right to your left, you will reach up high to your right set of risers, pull them down to your chest and hold them till you land. If the wind is blowing from your left to your right, you will reach up high to your left set of risers, pull them down to your chest, and hold them till you land.
Which takes us to our fifth point of performance, which is: land. To make a proper parachute landing fall, you must hit all five points of contact which are: balls of the feet, calf, thigh, buttock, and push-up muscle. You will never make a standing landing. Once you have activated your canopy release assembly, you will immediately place your weapon into operation, and remove yourself from the parachute harness. Once you’ve removed yourself from the parachute harness, collect up all necessary equipment, and locate your designated rally point. Some of the methods that I use to find my designated rally point are to look at the direction of flight of the aircraft above me, or to use my GPS.
Think you’re ready to jump out of a C-130 on an actual mission? Prove it.
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