Public Affairs Broadcast Specialist Sergeant King

2010 - EPISODE 5:

With very little sleep or none at all, operating in extreme climate conditions, teams must engage in a full body and mind assault.

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2010 - EPISODE 5:

With very little sleep or none at all, operating in extreme climate conditions, teams must engage in a full body and mind assault.

Captain Jeremy Shute: I grew up in a small town, Salem, New Jersey. I went to college, I knew I needed a way to pay for it, so I went and visited the Army department. When I got there, some of the first men I saw when I walked through the room were Rangers, and you could tell they had a swagger about them, they had a confidence, and those were the guys I wanted to be like from the second I saw them.
Yesterday, there was no margin for error with the Spot Jump. Team 6 set the standard and captured first place. Going into Day 2, Master Sergeant Turk and Master Sergeant Ross are holding on to the overall lead.
Fort Benning, Georgia, and the 27th Best Ranger Competition. Day 2. Todd Field. Day Stakes. The Ranger buddy teams have been on the go for 27 hours with very little sleep or none at all; operating in extreme climate conditions, and now they need to get prepped for a full body and mind assault in the combative exercise. Ranger up.
Captain Kurt Daniels: Task, conditions, standards. Tasks: enter and clear the building. Conditions: given a multiroom building with an unknown number of enemy personnel. All personnel on this objective are to be considered enemy combatants. You may only use the appropriate level of force, lethal or nonlethal. Standards: You’re gonna kill or capture all enemy on this objective as quickly as possible.
CSM Dennis Smith: Competitors will enter the room, meet a hostile or a nonhostile person within the room; they must make a decision, if they are to engage that person either via weapons or with the combative skills that they are trained throughout the Army today. They will subdue that person and then move to the next room where they could meet one or multiple combatants at that time.
Sergeant First Class Chad Stackpole: In today’s modern Army warfare, combatives is a skill that is instilled in every man; you never know what’s around that next corner; if you can’t get a weapon onto a target or eliminate a threat, you may have to utilize your hands to engage that target. You can fight to the last breath: If you don’t have a weapon system to fight with, your hands are your next best weapon system.
After the combative, the Ranger teams move immediately to the next task: the Tri-Tower.
Smith: Task, conditions, standards of the Tri-Tower event is to negotiate three towers, the rock climb ascent with the repel descent, the caving ladder ascent with the fries or fast rope descent, and then a rope climb ascent with a fries descent. The Tri-Tower event is a timed team event. The first team member must negotiate the obstacle completely before the next team member can start to negotiate the obstacle. Once the second team member has negotiated the obstacle, they move as a team to the next tower.
Stackpole: Climbing the rock wall as well as climbing the rope, there’s a lot of technique involved as far as how much upper-body strength to use with lower-body strength. At no point should you be utilizing just upper body or just lower body. You’ve got to find a fifty-fifty split to where you’re pushing and pulling at the exact same time.
Stackpole: Climbing the rock wall as well as climbing the rope, there’s a lot of technique involved as far as how much upper-body strength to use with lower-body strength. At no point should you be utilizing just upper body or just lower body. You’ve got to find a fifty-fifty split to where you’re pushing and pulling at the exact same time.
Team 16, Sergeant First Class Sarton and Captain Shute are first-time competitors, currently in twelfth place. They hope to make their mark this year.
Shute: Well, we had Sergeant First Class Sarton go first. He got up the wall relatively quickly. We knew we needed to get up that wall as fast as we could because if we could carry that momentum over the top of that wall and down the repel, the rest of it would be pretty easy for us.
Moving quickly to the next tower, it’s time for the caving ladder. First up is Sergeant First Class Sarton.
Stackpole: This event here is one of the most physically demanding throughout this day. You have to know your body enough and you have to train your body to know how hard it has to push throughout this competition. Rangers’ bodies get fatigued pretty quick throughout this one. Once they reach that second 30-foot tower, climbing that rope could be a major obstacle for a lot of these guys to accomplish.
Shute: We were pretty smoked by then but we knew, we knew what we needed to do.
Stackpole: At all costs, these guys know that they must make it to the top of the rope or they’re gonna take a major time penalty, which will hinder their overall score.
Shute: To me, it’s the epitome of my profession. To be an infantryman, you have to be a Ranger for this. It’s the responsibility; it’s the professionalism; it’s everything that comes with wearing a tab. That’s why it’s important to be a Ranger.
Up next, you’re first on the scene as a Ranger First Responder.
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