SERVING IN THE ARMY RESERVE
Army Medical Corps

As a health care professional with the U.S. Army Reserve, you’ll be exposed to new techniques, procedures and points of view. You’ll also gain knowledge and skills that you’ll be proud to take home to your own practice.

ARMY ROTC NURSE PROGRAM

Army ROTC nurse cadets may qualify for scholarships and other additional benefits to help start gaining the valuable career and leadership skills of an officer in the Army Nurse Corps.

Army Medicine

As a member of the U.S. Army health care team you will do what you do best — use your professional skills and best judgment to provide a full spectrum of patient care. You’ll provide this expert care in facilities that are second to none, using equipment and procedures that are often more advanced than their private-sector counterparts.

Along with offering competitive pay and comprehensive benefits, the U.S. Army health care team supports and encourages your continued learning. If you’re ready to specialize or pursue an advanced degree, we have a number of programs than can help. You may qualify to receive tuition, pay and allowances that will let you focus your attention on learning. And if you have nursing school loans to repay, the Active Duty Health Professions Loan Repayment Program may help you repay up to $120,000 of those loans.

The U.S. Army health care team offers one more important benefit. You may choose active duty or serve in the U.S. Army Reserve.  As a nurse and an officer on the U.S. Army Reserve health care team, you can continue to work in your own community and serve when needed. In addition to providing you with some great benefits, your experience here will enhance your career and enrich your life.

When we say you can expect more from a U.S. Army Nursing career, we mean it. To find out more,
contact a recruiter
.

FEATURES
Army Nurse Corps

Nurse Benefits

When you become a nurse and an officer in the Army, you’ll enjoy competitive pay and a comprehensive benefits package that includes low- or no-cost medical, dental and life insurance, generous retirement plan options, exciting educational opportunities, financial incentives and much more.

Learn More
ROTC Nursing cadet examines a child

Nursing Jobs & Careers

The U.S. Army has positions available in many specialties, including obstetrics/gynecology, critical care, nurse anesthesia, community health, psychiatric/behavioral health, and perioperative nursing, as well as advanced practice nursing roles such as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialist, nurse midwives and nurse anesthetists.

Learn More

Nurse Profiles

Meet some of the dedicated professionals currently in the Army Nurse Corps.

Learn More
Army Medical Nurse Corps

What is the Army Nurse Corps?

An integral component of the U.S. Army health care team, our nurses work in close collaboration with talented physicians, pharmacists, dietitians, therapists and other healthcare professionals to help us provide the care our Soldiers and their families deserve.

Learn More

Army Strong Stories

PreviousNext

Discussions

  • next of kin

    03.05.2014 - Hello, I have been speaking with a soldier online and I am very aware of the scams going on. I have asked this soldier t...

    Read More »
  • 1LT Oakley

    03.03.2015 - For AR soldiers attending IET, does the lease have to be in effect for a certain minimum amount of time to be eligible f...

    Read More »
  • What will happen when I return?

    03.02.2015 - I Joined, was sent to BCT, completed 2/3, was sent on medical, was given 30 days if I wanted to return, chose to stay, d...

    Read More »
  • LADIES! Help ya girl out.

    02.11.2015 - Hello all!   I am a female who is swearing in on Friday (yay) and leaving for BCT at Ft. Sill in May. All of the r...

    Read More »
  • Relocation Request

    03.03.2015 - Hello Everyone.     I just got to my first duty station at Fort Lewis with 1SFG(A) in August. I have hardly b...

    Read More »
  • Dual military questions

    03.02.2015 - I am married to an AD soldier, and I too will be joining the Army very soon. Packet is all done, the physical and signin...

    Read More »
  • For all those interested in joining Special Operations READ HERE FIRST.

    04.10.2014 - Why is it that there are so many of the same questions about Special Forces (Green Berets), 18X, Rangers, RASP, etc, etc...

    Read More »
  • 12m

    02.25.2015 - I have heard that becoming a 12m (firefighter) is one of the hardest jobs to get into is that true? I was also wondering...

    Read More »
  • Med School Scholarships

    03.02.2015 - Hi, I am a senior in high school and I want to be a surgeon. I have looked at doing ROTC for the first four years as an...

    Read More »
  • Senior year of highschool

    03.02.2015 - I am currently a junior in high school I am about to enroll in my senior year. My question is if any one has any advice ...

    Read More »
PreviousNext

CENTER FOR THE INTREPID

U.S. Army Health Care Facility Tour

Dr. Becky Hooper, Supervisory Program Manager, leads a tour group through the Center for the Intrepid.

This is a facility for those who have been intrepid in the defense of our country. If you look up that word in the dictionary, it means fearless and courageous.

My name is Becky Hooper. I'm a retired Army Physical Therapist. My connection with the Center for the Intrepid is that this is a rehab facility. It was built by over 600,000 Americans who donated to the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund.

Out patients are here sometimes up to seven hours a day. They might do OT in the morning, PT in the afternoon. That's an advantage that we have in our system. We aren't constrained by the requirements, the Medicare kind of thing.

This is our motion analysis lab. We have 26 infrared cameras spread out through the hall and three different areas where we can track patient movements. The main pathway is for running and walking – and if I was standing on this and it was turned on, it would know how much I weigh.

This is a system called the CAREN, which stands for computer-assisted rehab environment. We have an immersive type of environment, where a patient can experience a snowboarding scene at the top of a mountain and then have to adjust as the platform pitches forward. This is one of a kind. You will not see this domed system anywhere else in the world.

(Shows car.) The most important thing is all of the technology we can add to the vehicle, whether it is hand controls on the column or console, or special adaptations for driving. The simulation adds to the realism of getting back behind the wheel.

You see pictures behind you of what patients can do on the FlowRider. They work on balance, agility, coordination, core strength, upper body strength, endurance. And probably, most importantly, confidence.

Patients and families come in here for the first time and they realize, "Hey, good things are coming." I think you'll agree with me that they set us up for success.