SERVING IN THE ARMY RESERVE
Army Medical Corps

As a health care professional with the U.S. Army Reserve, you’ll be exposed to new techniques, procedures and points of view. You’ll also gain knowledge and skills that you’ll be proud to take home to your own practice.

PAY DOWN YOUR DENTAL SCHOOL LOAN
Army Dental Corps

As a dentist on the U.S. Army health care team, you can be eligible for up to $120,000 to pay down your dental school debt through the Active Duty Health Professional Loan Repayment Program.

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Army Medicine

A U.S. Army dentist does much more than practice in one area of dentistry. As an officer and a dentist, you may have the opportunity to advance your education in areas such as oral surgery, prosthodontics, endodontics, periodontics and orthodontics.

You will work with other dedicated dental professionals, consult board-certified specialists and possibly participate in important dental research.

In addition to a generous benefits package, you will have the opportunity to pursue your education through continuing education courses, seminars and conferences.

You can decide either to serve full time as an officer on active duty or maintain your practice in your community and serve as needed with the Army Reserve. Either way, becoming a U.S. Army dentist gives you a cumulative experience you can’t match anywhere in the private sector. And that’s part of a philosophy of the U.S. Army.

Helping others. Serving your country. Practicing your specialty. No other health care program can match the opportunities you’ll have or the professional experience you’ll gain in the Army Dental Corps.

To find out more about becoming a U.S. Army dentist, contact a recruiter.

Army Dental Corps

Dentists Benefits

Yes, our commitment to your education and advancement makes a U.S. Army career a standout. But Army dentists also benefit from the service’s commitment to an excellent quality of life. From 30 days’ paid vacation to comfortable on-base housing, and more, the U.S. Army offers many benefits designed to improve your quality of life.

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Army Dental Corps

DENTAL CAREERS & JOBS

The Army Dental Corps offers practice opportunities for dentists in several specialty areas — from endodontists to oral pathologists. You’ll be part of a truly integrated health care team, working with professionals who are passionate about their work and dedicated to providing the highest standard of patient care to our Soldiers and their families.

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Army Medical Corps

Dentist PROFILES

Meet some of the dedicated professionals currently in the Army Dental Corps.

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Army Dental Corps

WHAT IS THE DENTAL CORPS?

The Army Dental Corps comprises nine specialties, including comprehensive dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontistry, prosthodontistry and more. As a dentist and officer, you’ll do much more than practice dentistry. You’ll be trained as a leader and given the opportunity to participate in pioneering medical discovery and research.

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Army Strong Stories

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Discussions

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CPT CHRISTINE CERAR ENDODONTIC RESIDENT

Treating Soldiers

My name is Christine Cerar and I am a captain in the United States Army. I work at Fort Bragg in North Carolina where I'm an endodontic resident.

I commissioned into the Army in the spring of 2001. I went to the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine. The Army was critical in funding part of my education. The HPSP scholarship actually paid me while I was in school so I didn't go into debt.

We have a state of-the-art facility. It's phenomenal-just to train 8 residents. Each resident has their own dental assistant. In the civilian world that environment just doesn't exist. I'm spoiled, actually. It's been a career highlight. I feel very fortunate to be there.

I definitely have a life outside of the Army. I feel fortunate that I have the time for that. In private practice, time is money. In the military, you're able to have a very fulfilling social life. I'm able to go to the beach, take time to travel, spend time with friends.

I look at my peers and my friends in private practice. They can't always take time off. They have to take a financial hit when they do that.

One of the greatest things for me has been the overall feeling that I'm working with a team that's more like a family.

I LOVE treating Soldiers.

I think the best part of my job everyday is the knowledge that I'm treating America's sons and daughters. These people are the best patients to work on. I'm doing them a service and supporting their mission. I feel very proud to be a part of that.